Walmart Bums Out Wall Street; Puma Deals a Mighty Blow to Yeezy; Is IBM Back in the Game?

Fall-mart…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Walmart announced earnings and, in the process, managed to put a damper on Wall Street’s day. The company posted .6% growth and while nobody argues that growth is bad , the company still missed expectations of 1% growth. It’s now expected that Walmart will post a very boring flat line to illustrate its net sales even though previous forecasts called for 3% to 4% growth. Profits for Walmart fell almost 8% to $4.57 billion and posted revenues of $129.7 billion. While that may seem like a nice beefy number, analysts still expected $131 billion in revenue. The numbers weren’t helped by Walmart’s decision to close 269 stores worldwide, including 154 just in the United States. Then there were those wage increases and investments into its digital commerce that ate a bit into those profits. But Walmart is banking on the fact that those investments will yield big returns, even if it does mean a little wait. After all, if it’s gonna compete with Amazon, it’s gotta put in the time and money. Of course, mother-nature gets some of the blame too, seeing as how warm weather put a crimp in sales of cold weather merchandise. But don’t rule out the strong dollar, which also deserves plenty of the blame. At least shares are up over 6% in the last three months and the retailer is raising its dividend by 4 cents to generous $2 per share. Woohoo.

Swift karma…

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Image courtesy of winnond/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Puma had a very good quarter and much of the credit for that can go to Rihanna. Yes, that Rihanna. As the brand’s creative director, the pop star is helping shape the female future, as Puma refers to this endeavor. The company had higher than expected sales growth for its fourth quarter, just as Rihanna launched her first full goth-inspred line for the athletic apparel retailer. Back in the fall, RiRi’s remake of Puma’s classic suede kicks sold out within hours of going on sale. Puma’s profits were up 2.6% to 10.9 million euros, easily beating forecasts of 6.5 million euros. Sales rose 11.5% to 979 million euros when analysts expected just 839 million euros in sales. And maybe Kanye West should take to Twitter to hit up his sister-in-law, Kylie Jenner, for some cash, instead of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. She’s been named as the company’s brand ambassador, contrary to his hopes that she would be on his Team Yeezy Adidas line.

Have patients…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

IBM. Remember that name? The company just whipped out $2.6 billion for its latest acquisition, Truven Health Analytics. Under CEO Ginny Rometty, IBM has so far spent $4 billion in acquisitions in the last 12 months but this latest one is IBM’s biggest purchase in three years. Wall Street reacted kindly by giving shares of IBM their biggest jump since 2013, and sending them all the way up to $134. That’s especially reassuring for IBM since it posted 15 straight quarters of declining sales. Truven was acquired since IBM brass thought it would fit nicely into its Watson Health biz unit. FYI, Watson is IBM’s fabulous collection of artificial intelligence technologies that does all kinds of super fun stuff like taking data apart to analyze it, interpret it and see if any patterns can be predicted.  With this acquisition, IBM will have health info on 300 million patients and employ 5,000 people worldwide.

 

 

 

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Icahn: A Man of Letters; IBM Looks to Weather Some Storms; Twitter Has Yet to Impress

Icahn. Therefore I am…

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Carl Icahn took time out of his busy schedule of haranguing Congress and ousting CEO’s to write yet another letter, this time on his website, to insurance company AIG. Icahn now owns a sizable chink of the company, though exactly how much remains a mystery. He only tells us that it is very “large.” I, for one, believe him, just cause it’d be kind of weird to make something like that up. Besides, he usually goes big. In his advice letter to AIG, the activist investor writes, “There is no more need for procrastination.” He wants AIG split up into three separate divisions because he’s not digging the company’s “Systemically Important Financial Institution” status, or SIFI if you’re feeling funky.  If you find that term a bit too clunky, then, by all means, refer to it by its other more user-friendly term, “Too Big To Fail,” as in the 2008 fiscal crisis and the HBO movie of the same name (that starred Bill Pullman  as JP Morgan Chase’s Jamie Dimon and Ed Asner as Warren Buffet). Icahn believes that when a company gets SIFI status it’s bad. It’s like a tax. A tax of a bunch of regulators breathing down your fiscal back with heavy breaths of federal oversight. Companies that don’t get saddled with that status are more valuable to shareholders, in Mr. Icahn’s not-so-humble opinion. Icahn wants to divide AIG into a property and casualty coverage division, a life insurance division, and a mortgage backing division. Then he wants to throw in some cuts and have AIG buy back some stock. After that, he feels AIG will start trading closer to its book value at about $100 a share. Right now the stock is trading at just under $64 and trades for less than 80% of its book value (which, by the way measures assets minus liabilities). As for AIG CEO Peter Hancock, well, Icahn will probably find a way to kick him out of AIG if he doesn’t take his advice.

Super duper…

Image courtesy of  Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today’s big shopper is IBM, who is getting set to acquire The Weather Co.’s digital assets. In case you were wondering (because I know you were), those digital assets are its websites and apps. The channel, however, stays put, as it doesn’t really fit into IBM’s master plan. That master plan involves IBM beefing up its Watson Internet of Things Unit, its artificial intelligence unit that puts the super in supercomputer. The data supplied by the deal will give Watson the ability to create accurate forecasts – is that an oxymoron? – and will be able to provide commercial clients, from airlines to insurance companies, and beyond, very precise information. While the exact terms of the purchase have yet to be disclosed, the deal is rumored to be valued at around $2 billion. Naturally, shares of IBM took a little ride on the uptown train because of the super news.

These are the not quite the Moments…

Image courtesy of bplanet/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of bplanet/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Twitter is down 13% for the year and another 11% just today, and yet the micro-blogging site still beat the street. The social media company pulled down $569 million in revenue adding ten cents per share. Analysts predicted that Twitter would score closer to $560 million and add only a nickel per share. In terms of last year at this time, Twitter was up 58%. But here’s where things start to go south. The company revised its fourth quarter profit outlook between $695 million and $710 million. That seems like a whole lot of cash except that analysts were expecting numbers closer to $740 million. Then we turn to growth. There wasn’t that much of it.  Twitter only managed to add about 4 million new active monthly users. A very unimpressive 11% increase over the same time last year. Analysts, however, are still optimistic that launches, including the much-hyped Moments, and its increasing ad revenues will help turn the company’s fiscal tide.