Wal-Mart’s New Change is Making a Dash for it; Glassdoor’s Latest List Might Just Have You Rethinking Your Workplace; Mega Merger Round Two

 

A dash of this… 

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Image courtesy of photostock/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Big news from Wal-mart today. Huge news, in fact. The retail giant is changing its name… to Walmart. Are you stumped? Okay. Here’s a hint: The company is ditching the dash in its name. Or hyphen. Or line.  Or whatever you want to call that thingy in the middle of its name that’s been there since the retailer was incorporated back in 1969. And not that Wal-mart has anything against dashes, hyphens or lines, mind you. It’s just that Walmart, or Wal-mart, depending on how much you care about the dash, feels that legally changing its name to omit the dash emphasizes the fact that it sells merchandise both online and off. Got it? Neither do I. But I’m guessing Wal-mart must have done some hefty research to arrive at this conclusion. This conclusion being that if you want to give Amazon a run for its money then hyphens be damned. Apparently they don’t exactly scream out e-commerce leader and thus the little unassuming line will be getting the boot come February 1. And if you happened to have grown attached to the name “Wal-mart Stores,” then I have bad news for you. The company will also legally be droppping the word “stores” from its official name. And presumably there is research to support this move as well. Go figure.

How’s that cubicle looking?

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Image courtesy of James Barker/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It’s that time of year again where you get to be reminded that you, in fact, do not work for a great company and it’s time to get off your butt and do something about it. Glassdoor did a little research via anonymous employee reviews and came out with a list of the top companies, according to their employees. And wouldn’t you know it – a social media company that goes by the catchy name of Facebook tops the list for the third year in a row. And if you think employees like working there just for all the amazing cafeterias then you’d be partly right. It seems the company’s mission-driven culture and impact on the world really resonates with its employees. Over at Bain & Company it’s all about company culture and competitive compensation packages. Which explains why the consulting firm came in at number two. Other names you know on the list: In-N-Out Burger takes spot number 4. Besides the tasty milkshakes and Double-Double burgers and fries employees enjoy on daily basis, they also get paid vacation time and 401(k) plans, among many many other perks. Google comes in at number 5 and I’m guessing the massages and excellent parental leave plans have something to do with that impressive ranking. Even yoga apparel maker Lululemon lands on the list at the number 6 spot. How zen. A newcomer to the list is St. Jude Children’s Hospital. Given the company’s mission, to help heal sick children, the company culture of literally trying to save as many lives as possible makes this a place where people love to work.  To see if your company made the cut or you just want to do a little research on where you’ll be applying for your next job, check out Glassdoor’s Best Places to work list.

Da-merger…

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Image courtesy of Tony Dowson/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today’s mega healthcare merger is brought to us by UnitedHealth and DaVita, as the battle for healthcare dominance continues to make Wall Street swoon with all the billions involved. Not to be outdone by the $69 billion CVS Health/Aetna deal announced earlier this week, UnitedHealth Group has plans all its own for its nifty not-so-little unit called Optum. Optum is plunking down close to $5 billion in cash for another nifty entity called DaVita Medical Group, which is a subsidiary of the aptly named DaVita Inc.  Now, what’s so special about DaVita Medical Group that’s got UnitedHealth throwing billions at it? The company has hundreds of urgent care centers, surgery centers and medical clinics across the country that, besides providing invaluable services, also, presumably, bring in tons of cash.  Apparently, these mega-mergers are meant to benefit consumers by offering a host of services and benefits at lower costs than what companies can offer on their own. While the verdict’s still out on that bit, plenty of healthcare professionals are also waiting with bated breath to see if and how it will impact them, either positively or not. Until then I would advise you to just stay healthy.

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How Trump Is Dulling Tiffany & Co.’s Sparkle; Just Another Multi-billion Dollar Monday; Oil Vey! OPEC Squabbles Over Oil Cuts

Occupying 5th Ave…

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Image courtesy of Boykung/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Despite occupying some of the the best real estate in the world, Tiffany & Co.’s New York flagship store is having some sales troubles no thanks to president-elect Donald Trump,  whose nearby police barricades, protests and secret service detail have taken a big chunk out of the store’s traffic. And that’s a huge problem, especially because the U.S. is Tiffany & Co.’s biggest market, and its Manhattan store accounts for 8% of the company’s sales. At least there’s China and Japan, whose currency fluctuations allowed consumers in those regions to take advantage of a strong yen that had them picking up all kinds of nifty goods from the iconic jeweler. Mainly because of that, the company posted a surprise 1.2% sales increase – the first sales rise in eight quarters. Same store sales didn’t fare as badly either, even though experts thought they would. Instead of declining an expected 2.8%, they fell just 2%. In the United States, presumably in locations where Trump does not reside, Tiffany & Co. experienced a smaller than expected drop, falling just 2% compared to last year at this time. The luxury jeweler scored a $95 million profit, pulling down 76 cents per share on sales of $949.3 million. Analysts only expected 67 cents to be added to shares with sales totaling $923.7 million.

Shattered…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Move over $3.36 billion. Move over $3.39 billion. The original sales estimates for cyber-Monday proved no match for the actual numbers. Adobe Digital Insights whipped out the results for this year’s post-Thanksgiving shopping extravaganza, which blew estimates out of the water and came in at a whopping $3.45 billion – over a 12% increase from last year’s cyber-Monday purchases. But what’s super weird is that apparently there were less deals on cyber-Monday than on Black Friday. However, Black Friday’s numbers were looking awfully green as well, setting a record with a 22% increase over last year and coming in at just $110 million less than cyber-Monday. Some analysts were a bit concerned that the abundance of web sales on Thanksgiving would put a dent in cyber-Monday’s digits. But wouldn’t you know it? That didn’t happen. Purchases made using Wall-Mart’s app jumped 150% while Amazon is expecting to report its best cyber-Monday. Ever. But you’re just going to have to take their word for it. As for losers, look no further than Macy’s. Perhaps it was karma for opening its doors at 5:00 pm on Thanksgiving Day, but the company experienced outages on its website that kept a lot of shoppers from making a lot of purchases on the company’s site. The amount of money the retailer likely lost was probably not enough to offset the fact that it opened its doors on Thursday. Boohoo.

Why can’t we oil just get along?

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Image courtesy of Rawich/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, also known as OPEC, is having a big fancy meeting in Vienna tomorrow. At issue is the problem that there is way too much oil floating around all over the world. This oil glut is making oil prices low which makes for really good prices at the pump. However, the countries that produce all this oil don’t like that one bit and are trying to agree on how to fix it so that prices go up again and they can start making cold hard cash. Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq are the biggest oil producers and the logical step would be for each country to cut their production. But none of them want to do that. There’s a lot of ego involved. It’s like color war, but with actual valuable commodities at stake, besides national pride. Saudi Arabia is proposing cuts of 1.2 million barrels per day. However, Iran’s not down for making any cuts because it feels it needs to make up for lost time from all those years of Western sanctions it faced – and totally deserved – and still does deserve. Iraq is using ISIS as a very convenient, if somewhat legit excuse since it is, after all, fighting a war against a psychopathic terrorist organization, and the money it gets from selling oil helps fund that lofty endeavor. Rumor has it that Iran and Iraq are coming around but no word on whether Saudi Arabia will play ball. So stay tuned to see if and when more OPEC drama plays out, and how this drama will affect your wallet and your green car aspirations.

 

Twitter’s Attempts to Tweet Out Terror; Wal-Mart Boffo Earnings; EPA Calls Out Harley-Davidson

Tweet this…

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Looks like ISIS is going to have to find itself a new social media platform as Twitter pats itself on the back today after announcing it suspended 235,000 terrorist-related accounts in the last six months. That figure was about double over the previous period and the social media company went to great lengths getting bigger teams to review reports of flagged content on the site on a round the-clock-basis. Better spam detection and language capabilities also helped with the endeavor as the amount of time between content getting flagged and shutting down that content has gone down. But the great effort only really came about after Twitter took a lot of heat for allowing terrorist-related content to gain a big foothold on ISIS’s preferred site. Even the director of the FBI said how “Twitter was a devil on their shoulder” back in 2015. ISIS could have given courses on how to optimize media engagement as the terror organization regularly used Twitter to spread propaganda, recruit fellow murderers, raise funds for their evil ways and publicize its horrific actions. But to be fair, Twitter does have a policy in place prohibiting the promotion of violence and terrorism.  In any case, while Twitter concedes there’s no real “magic algorithm,”  to finding and shutting down terrorist activities on its site, there has been a noticeable drop on Twitter of all things ISIS and other terror-related organizations.

What bad retail landscape?

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It’s good to be Wal-Mart as the largest retailer in all the land posted better than expected results with revenue of $121 billion and a $3.8 billion profit for the second quarter, adding $1.21 per share. Analysts predicted shares would only gain $1.02. That profit was a very welcome 9% increase over last year’s $3.5 billion second quarter profit while the revenue figure beat projections by about $2 billion. If Macy’s Kohl’s and Target are left scratching their heads after their disappointing earnings, perhaps they should take a page or two from Wal-Mart’s playbook. The company made a major push in its e-commerce division, which always helps matters when you’re competing with the likes of Amazon.  Wal-Mart also increased its full year earnings outlook to $4.15- $4.35, up from $4.00 – $4.30. In addition to lower gas prices and warm weather, Wal-Mart brass attribute its great earnings to the boost they gave to employee wages which they think led to better customer experiences. Maybe it did. Maybe it didn’t. But there’s no denying the  company experienced stronger than expected sales growth.

Exhaust-ed…

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Image courtesy of sritangphoto/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Look out VW. There’s a new emissions offender in town. This time the dubious distinction goes to iconic motorcycle maker, Harley-Davidson, who has to pay a $12 million penalty and another $3 million to fund a clean-air project.  The U.S. claims the company violated air pollution laws through its “super-tuner” devices.  These devices, while improving engine performance, also caused the exhaust levels for those engines to increase well beyond what they were allowed. Then there were some 12,682 bikes that were also found to be short of regulatory requirements. Even though Harley-Davidson graciously disagrees with the EPA’s findings, it settled if only to avoid a long-drawn out and very expensive legal battle. As part of the settlement, Harley-Davidson doesn’t even have to admit wrongdoing. After all, who likes to admit when they’re wrong, eh? In any case, the company will cease selling the devices by August 23 and will have to buy back and destroy the devices from the dealerships. Naturally, shares of Harley-Davidson did take an 8% hit following the news of its own emissions scandal, but they recovered relatively quickly. Sort of.

Aetna Becomes Obamacare Dropout; Warren Buffet Takes a Big Bite Out of (the) Apple; TJX: Don’t Discount the Discounter

See ya!

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In case it wasn’t entirely clear how some big insurance companies feel about Obamacare, perhaps Aetna might shed some light for you. The healthcare insurer is dropping out of the exchange in 69% of its counties. It’s dropping out of 11 of 15 states after eating $200 million in pre-tax losses during its 2Q. Of the 838,000 Affordable Care Act policies it has, 20% will be adversely affected. Aetna, which is the nation’s third largest insurer, isn’t the first health insurance company to do this. United Healthcare Group already dropped out of Obamacare exchanges and as did Kaiser, with more expected to follow. Whichever side you fall on in terms of the Obamacare debate matters not. It’s arithmetic that’s at play here. Aetna argues that they were losing big money to make the Obamacare policies work. Not enough healthy people were signing up and too many unhealthy people were. The premiums that healthy folks pay were/are intended to offset the large cost of the the unhealthy. Unfortunatey, things didn’t work out that way. The Departement of Health and Human Services was supposed to figure out ways to fix that issue. While its says it did, insurers say it didn’t – or at least, not enough. If you’re really bent on having Aetna insure you and your state’s just been dropped by it, you might want to consider moving to Delaware, Iowa, Nebraska and Virginia. Those states will still be offering policies from Aetna in 2017. Well, at least for now they will be.

Well, if Warren Buffet’s Doing it…

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Berkshire Hathaway’s very own oracle is taking a much bigger chunk out of the not-so-proverbial apple – the one based in Cupertino, that is. Warren Buffet upped his stake in the tech company by a substantial 55%. That’s in direct contrast to his fellow billionaire’s recent actions. George Soros just chucked his Apple stake out the window over concerns in China, or rather concerns about China’s policies regarding the iPhone maker. However, there’s a chance he’ll re-invest down the road. Activist investor billionaire Carl Icahn also ditched his Apple shares back in June. When he did this, shares of Apple had taken a slight dip, at which point Warren Buffet swooped in and increased his stake. Now his total stake of 15. 2 million shares is valued at about $1.7 billion. Shares of Apple, by the way, are up 14% since June. Incidentally, Wal-Mart didn’t fare so well as far as Berkshire Hathaway’s portfolio is concerned. The Oracle of Omaha cut Berkshire Hathaway’s stake in the world’s largest retailer by 27%, keeping it at just over 40.2 million shares. But Warren Buffet has had Wal-Mart in its portfolio a decade now and while his stake might be reduced, it’s probably still not going anywhere. For now. Curious what else Berkshire Hathaway has sitting in its very lucrative portfolio? Coca Cola, American Express, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft Heinz, Wells Fargo…to name but a few.

Who you calling off-price?

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Macy’s and friends might be bemoaning the state of the retail landscape. But they won’t get much sympathy from discount retailers T.J. Maxx. Its parent company TJX Cos came out with its second quarter sales results that had the retailer beating predictions.  But all was not perfect from the company that also owns Marshall’s and HomeGoods. It put out a bit of a bleaker picture for its third quarter that caused shares to fall today, despite its stellar performance.  In all fairness, that depressing and most unimpressive outlook is primarily because TJX Cos is waging war against a strong dollar. Besides, the company is giving out wage increases, so its hard to be mad at a company whose fiscal prowess is taking a hit for a very noble cause. There is even a silver lining – the company is turning out to be a big draw, luring shoppers away from malls with its deeply discounted merchandise on major name brands. Profit for TJX Cos was $562.2 million with 84 cents added to shares, while analysts only predicted 80 cents per share.  A year ago at this time, the company picked up $549.3 million with 80 cents added to shares. The stock is up 17% since January.

 

Wal-Mart Brings it Home with Great Earnings; A New Pew Study is Out and the Results May Surprise You; SEC Takes a Swing at Golfer Phil Mickelson

Sweet…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Wal-Mart showered us with the news of its higher than expected quarterly profits and that’s a good sign since Wal-Mart’s success is a barometer of the economy and how well it’s behaving. Wal-Mart, in case you weren’t aware, is considered to be less upscale than its rival, Target. Because Target did not do so well this quarter and Wal-Mart did, experts are quick to point out that those in a more modest income bracket are still spending, at Wal-Mart anyways, and that is always a welcome occurrence in a healthy economy. Wal-Mart can thank an increase in drug prices, which is not as bad as it sounds. Hey, people need their medicines. But that’s just one small reason for the impressive digits. Warm weather helped keep Wal-Mart’s utility costs lower, which also contributed to those welcome numbers. Don’t laugh. Any little bit helps, even if it does involve the thermostat. A profit is a profit and Wal-Mart’s was $.304 billion. That figure is actually less than last year’s $3.34 billion, but its because of investments to improve the retailer and not because of any negative reasons. The retailer shelled out $2.7 billion to increase entry level pay and that also helped out with some of that profit. The company added 98 cents per share when analysts expected only 88 cents per share. And who doesn’t like it when analysts get it wrong, right?   As a result of the fiscally delightful news, shares of Wal-Mart made a nice little jump today, which is especially good since shares had gone down over 20% in the last twelve months.

The gig is up…

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The Pew Research Center just released the results of its latest study, this time tackling the ever-popular “sharing economy.” For whatever reason, the center wanted to know what 4,787 U.S. adults think about Uber and Lyft, Kickstarter and Airbnb, to name a few. Turns out that 72% of U.S. adults have used at one of 11 different shared/on-demand platforms.  73% responded that they’d never heard of the term “sharing economy.” But that’s nothing compared to the 89% who didn’t know what a “gig economy” is. Then things started to get dicey. 15% of the people surveyed said they’d used shared and on-demand services like Uber and Lyft, yet 30% said they’d never heard of those apps. Household income and age played a big role in who used the apps. 41% of U.S. adults with annual incomes of more than $100,000 had used at least four of the services, which was more than three times that of adults whose annual incomes were less than $30,000. 39% of college graduates used at least four of the services. Not nearly so much for those who don’t have higher degrees. For those in the 50+ range, 44% said they’ve used at least four of the services. But of the 65 and above set , only 5% used the services. While ride-sharing apps were – no great shock – used primarily by young adults in big cities, middle aged adults were the primary users of services offered by apps like Airbnb. And even though Kickstarter and other crowd-funding apps have only been around since 2009, 22% of U.S. adults apparently gave donations through them. Yet 61% of those who responded said they’d never heard of the term “crowd-funding.”

Inside out…

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Pro-golfer Phil Mickelson is under investigation and it has nothing to do with sports. The SEC has set its sights on the five time major winner for insider trading. Apparently, Mickelson scored almost a million bucks and the SEC wants him to pay it all back…with interest. To be fair, Mickelson is classified as a “relief defendant” which means he hasn’t been officially accused of…anything. He does, however, still have to pay back his insider trading profit of $931,738.12, not to mention another $105,291.09 in interest. But hey, it’s better than doing time, a possibility for the two men who supplied him with the non-publicizied information. And those two men happen to be well known sports gambler Billy Walters and former chairman of Dean Foods, Thomas Davis. It’s no mistake that the “ill-gotten gains” were from Dean Foods. Which explains why Walters and Davis are now both facing criminal charges, while Mickelson’s attorneys get to call their client, who currently ranks 17th in the world, an “innocent bystander.”

Google Spits in the Face of Online Payday Lenders; This Trump’s For You; Mega Merger Nixed

Well if Google’s doing it…

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Google has been able to do what politicians couldn’t. Which might mean that its up to Google to Make America Great Again. In any case, online payday lenders are officially getting the boot from Google.  Come July 13, companies that deal in online payday loans wont get their ads displayed above search results under Google’s AdWords program. If you think that’s awfully harsh, then consider that payday loans are often due in 60 days and carry annual interest rates of at least 36%. Other types of loans and lenders will still be able to keep their ads in place, though. For now. Facebook has been banning payday loan ads since last summer, while Yahoo has still yet to catch on. A payday lender trade group called Google’s new policy “discriminatory and a form of censorship.” However, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has its own thoughts about the online payday lending industry. The CFPB’s cold hard research highlights the numerous hidden risks, costly banking fees and account closures resulting from these loans. The industry also tends to disproportionately target minorities. The CFPB found that a staggering one third of borrowers had their accounts closed by their banks while half of the borrowers paid an average of $185 in back penalties. And that’s before you even get to the annual percentage rate of 391% that are placed on these types of loans

 

This America’s for you…

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Next time you reach for an icy cold brew, you might just be wondering why it looks a little different. Riding the fiscal wave of patriotism, Budweiser will be rebranding its cans “America.” Instead of the slogan “King of Beers,” beer drinkers will find the slogan “E Pluribus Unum” on the cans. And in case it matters, Donald Trump is taking the credit that companies are inspired by his “Make America Great Again” campaign slogan. Really. During an interview on Fox News, Trump said, “They’re so impressed with what our country will become. They decided to do this before the fact.” Never mind that Budweiser’s parent company, Anheuser Busch InBev is Belgian. That’s just a minor detail. Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, along with Hershey’s, Coca Cola, Wal-Mart and even Carl’s Jr. are using patriotic marketing campaigns that are expected to last well past election season. To be fair, Hershey is utilizing this tactic because the company is an official sponsor of the Olympic U.S. team. For the first time in 122 years, the coloring on Hershey bars will be different , as red, white and blue will feature prominently on the confection’s wrappers. As for Wal-Mart, the gigantic retailer made a pledge back in 2013 to buy $250 billion worth of products that are “made in the U.S.A.” And let’s forget that minor hiccup when the chain was investigated by the FTC for mislabeling products that were, in fact, not made domestically.

Lay off my stapler!

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Shares of Staples and Office Depot took a nasty beating after a Federal judge ruled that the two companies cannot merge in fiscal blissful matrimony. The $6.3 billion merger was nixed since the judge felt that a huge merger between the two largest office supplies suppliers would be a horrible thing for consumers. The Federal Trade Commission thought the merger was as anti-competitive as it gets and couldn’t be more pleased with the judge’s ruling. Both the judge and the FTC felt competitive pricing, quality and service would be tossed aside as consumers would look on helplessly as they handed over their hard-earned cash. Office Depot said it won’t appeal the ruling. And why should it? It’s now going to get a $250 million break up fee from Staples. But that $250 million pales in comparison to the revenue it would have seen and the money it would have saved had the merger gone through. This was the second time, since 1997, that the two companies tried to merge. Shares of Staples fell 20% on the news at one point during the day, while Office Depot tanked about 40%. Staples and Office Depot continue to take massive hits from the other competition, Amazon. Amazon’s business to business division is but a year old, yet it already racked up more than a billion dollars in sales. And that’s while Staples and Office Depot were hit with massive losses.

No-GoPro on Earnings; Could a Pfizer/Allergan Merger Become the Next Big Thing?; Wal-Mart Offers NO Free Shipping (limitations apply)

Worst. Day. Ever….

Image courtesy of jesadaphorn/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of jesadaphorn/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

GoPro released its earnings yesterday only to tell us that it did not nail them. This came as a surprise to…no one.  Wall Street echoed its disappointment by sending shares down. Very down. So down, in fact, that the stock is hovering too close to its IPO price of $24 from back in 2014. GoPro miraculously managed to score $400 million in revenue, adding 25 cents per share. Too bad predictions called for almost $434 million and 29 cents per share. Meanwhile, the stock is down 67% for the year and the company is looking to buy back company shares, hoping to increase their value. While GoPro saw second quarter sales kick up by 72%, third quarter sales only increased by 43%. And the picture only gets grimmer as the company actually thinks sales will shrink during the ever-fiscally critical holiday season.  Part of GoPro’s problem is that it can’t seem to figure out how to transform itself from a product for a niche market to a product that spews mass appeal. Then we turn to GoPro’s Hero4Session. Besides the fact that the company initially charged too much for the product, GoPro also insists that the marketing budget for the already too-high priced product wasn’t large enough. Analysts aren’t too optimistic that they are gong to see much, if any, growth in GoPro’s camera unit in 2017. However, they are forecasting $500 million worth of revenue for GoPro’s other products. Go figure.

Erin Go Bragh…

Image courtesy of Pansa/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Pansa/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today’s latest tax inversion plans are brought to us by Pfizer and Allergan Plc who are in “friendly talks” to create the world’s largest drug maker.  While no actual agreement has been reached, the deal would have Pfizer heading towards Ireland where corporate tax laws are far more favorable there than they are here. Can’t you just smell the politics that are about to invade this deal? Tax inversions happen when huge companies set up shop overseas in countries where they don’t get as brutally taxed as they do here. For instance, while Pfizer has the pleasure of shelling out a 25% tax rate to Uncle Sam, Ireland-based Allergan only has to deal with a 15% tax rate. The prohibitive tax rate can put many U.S. companies at an unfair advantage, they argue. Democrats think these companies should just suck it up and stay put. They also think drug companies should simply slash their high prices. However, these drug companies say they can’t do that with such high tax rates imposed. Republicans want those tax laws changed to make them more favorable for these big companies so that they’ll stay put because they want to. Not because they are being forced to. If any deal goes through, it will likely be the biggest deal. Ever. Estimates for Pfizer to buy Allergan range from about $113 billion to $157 billion. But isn’t it worth every cent if it means adding everybody’s favorite aesthetic filler into your drug fold?

No such thing as ‘free shipping?’

Image courtesy of SundayMorning/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of SundayMorning/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

If you can’t beat ’em…well do something they can’t do.  And that’s exactly why Wal-Mart is scrapping free shipping this holiday season on items that are less than $50. The idea is to instead offer free shipping – for in-store pick up. After all, there are approximately 4,600 Wal-Mart stores from which to choose. Besides, Wal-Mart’s hoping that while you’re picking up an ordered item, you’ll impulsively pick up some other items.  And companies love impulse shoppers.  To entice you to use this method, Wal-Mart is even allowing you to check-in at the store with your smart phone for expedited service. Wal-Mart’s hoping that this new shipping policy will help its profit margins, which have taken a bit of a hit, in part, because of shipping costs. And with 210 million consumers expected to use Wal-Mart’s mobile app, the giant retailer is banking that in-store pick-up will reverse those hits.