Target-ing Pay;

You raise me up…

Image courtesy of nongpimmy/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of nongpimmy/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Target’s being a follower and that means only good things for some 350,000 of its employees. The retailer is raising its minimum wage from $8.83 to a whopping $9.00 an hour. Don’t laugh. The federal minimum wage is still only $7.25. Walmart already made that move several weeks back and TJX, which owns TJ Maxx, Marshall’s and Home Goods, is also set to follow suit. So what exactly is the downside of raising the minimum wage and why doesn’t everybody just do it already? Critics of raising the minimum wage feel that sometimes doing so might deter employers from hiring more people if they feel they have to shell out more money to do so. So yeah, it’s great if employers are paying more, just as long as you are able to get a job with them, to begin with.  Speaking of not having jobs, this minimum wage announcement comes on the heels of Target’s earlier announcement that it’s cutting about 3,000 jobs. Target’s going to need a few bucks to pay off that $10 million settlement over its 2013 security breach where 40 million cards were compromised and the personal financial information of well over a 110 million people was accessed. Victims could get up to $10,000 in damages but Target doesn’t plan on making it easy for them to collect. Alleged victims will have to bear the burden of proof and submit adequate documentation on losses they incurred.

Monopolize!

Image courtesy of James Barker/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of James Barker/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

A big happy birthday shout out goes to Monopoly, the iconic board game who turns 80 today.  The game, owned by Hasbro, comes in 47 languages and is available in 114 countries. You could pick up the game for a whole $2, back in 1935, when Parker Brothers originally bought it up from Charles Darrow. But its roots go even deeper, back to 1903, when a woman named Elizabeth Magie came up with the original incarnation of the game, which was meant to highlight the unfairness of property ownership. Ironically, Monopoly has become the world’s best-selling board game. 275 million copies of the game have sold, with more than $30 billion worth of Monopoly money printed each year, and each game coming with $20,580. Rumor has it that Mr. Monopoly, himself, a.k.a Rich Uncle Pennybags is based on none other than J.P. Morgan.  To mark the momentous occasion, Monopoly has come out with its latest version dubbed “Here and Now.” Cities all over the world voted for their picks to make it onto newest board. In case you were wondering, Illinois Avenue, B&O Railroad and the “GO” space are the three most frequently “landed-on” spaces.  Now if only Atlantic City, whose street names can be found on Monopoly board games, can channel some of Monopoly’s success for itself, it might be able to pull itself up from all its recent economic struggles.

GDY mate…

Image courtesy of cooldesign/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of cooldesign/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Chances are, if you have a domain name, you went through GoDaddy.com to buy it. The company, which also does web-hosting, wants to make its Wall Street IPO and is looking to raise $418 million with a valuation around $2.87 billion. Just three years ago GoDaddy.com was picked up by KKR and Silver Lake Management and now, here they are looking to offer up 22 million shares for about $17 – $19 a pop.  The company, which currently handles about 20% of the world’s domain names, has approximately 12.7 million customers and took in $1.39 billion for 2014. That was a hefty a 23% increase over 2013. Look for its ticker symbol one day: “GDY.” Catchy, huh?

Morgan Stanley Finally Owns Up to All the Trouble It Caused; It’s a Darn Claim Unemployment Filings Are Up; Sears is Losing It

It was just a matter of time…

Image courtesy of  dream designs/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of dream designs/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Morgan Stanley is taking a bit of a beating today on Wall Street now that it has finally finally settled with the Department of Justice over its shady little role leading up to the 2008 financial crisis. Morgan Stanley reached a deal with the DOJ  that’ll have the bank paying $2.6 billion to get Uncle Sam off its back.  Attorney General Eric Holder and the DOJ will graciously end their probe into whether Morgan Stanley duped investors by telling them how very great their home loans were when in fact, they were anything but. This settlement is sure to put a major dent in MorganStanley’s 2014 profits. By major, I mean it’ll eat up nearly 50% of what MorganStanley got to take home in 2014. It officially lands Morgan Stanley on that illustrious list of banks who also had to shell out billion dollar settlements to the DOJ for their smarmy actions leading up to and during the 2008 financial crisis, including  – but not limited to –  Bank of America who reigns the top spot with a $16.7 billion payout. It’s followed by JPMorgan Chase which holds the number two spot for its $13 billion settlement. Citigroup rounds out the group with a $7 billion settlement.

Don’t stake this claim… 

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The number of people filing jobless claims went up. Not down. But up. The number climbed to 313,000 people instead of a projected 290,000. While the news is a bit of drag, economists  – who presumably know a thing or two  – are telling us that we can’t work ourselves up into a collective panic over one month’s lousy numbers. At least for now, anyway. First, the number of people filing those claims is still relatively close to the 300,000 mark. If it were way past that number, then yeah, having a fiscal freak out might be considered almost acceptable. Two, the labor market’s rockin’, sort of, and hiring is strong, which brings us to reason number three. Because hiring is strong, wages are actually going up. Walmart, TJ Maxx, Gap…the list goes on as to how many retailers are raising its employees’ wages. All these factors allow us to almost ignore this fiscal hiccup. However, leave it to Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen to remind us that, “wage growth remains sluggish” and that there’s always room for improvement.  You don’t say.

Loser…

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Sears isn’t having a very good year. Actually it hasn’t had a good year in…well, many many years. It just reported its fourth straight year of losses with this quarter losing $159 million and $1.50 per share. Incidentally, that figure is not nearly as dismal as last year’s $358 million fourth quarter loss. So you see, there is a bright side. Sort of. Run by the The Hoffman Estates, which also runs Kmart, the company has tried just about everything to help the ailing retailer reverse its downward financial spiral. From store closures to slashing inventory, the retailer has tried countless ways to cut costs. The company closed over 230 stores in 2014 and today has over 1,700 stores, which sounds impressive. But you know what’s more impressive? The over 3,500 stores the company had five years ago. The latest plan is to spin off between 200-300 stores into a REIT, which stands for Real Estate investment trust, by the way. The idea is apparently going to allow the failing company to pick up some $2 billion and help turn the fiscal tide. But if you want to know how exactly that works you’re on your own.