Trump Tweet-Targets Nordstrom; Under Armour CEO Says It All Wrong; Wells Fargo Continues to Anger

Oh no you didn’t…

id-100146553

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Just one week after pulling Ivanka Trump’s fashion line from its stores, Nordstrom has managed to incur some serious Presidential social-media wrath, via Twitter of course. The Tweeter-In-Chief wrote that his daughter was “treated so unfairly” by the department store and “She is a great person — always pushing me to do the right thing! Terrible!” Nordstrom argued that the merchandise’s performance wasn’t up to snuff, and that it regularly evaluates the thousands of brands that it carries to decide which ones get the boot and which ones don’t. And Ivanka’s line got it, though the chain had been carrying the line since 2009. Back in November, Nordstrom co-president Pete Nordstrom sent out a company memo explaining that the turmoil surrounding the election is putting the retailer in a “tight spot.” It risks offending Trump-haters for keeping the line, but also risks alienating shoppers who support him. Nordstrom tried to explain that it makes a “sincere effort not to make business decisions based on politics but on performance and results,” but found itself “in a very difficult position.”  That difficult position probably had to do with calls for boycotts of the merchandise, and even the store.  And it’s not like Nordstrom was the only one who took this sort of action. Neiman Marcus Group also stopped selling her jewelry online and in one of its stores in the northeast. Shares of Nordstrom had dropped a smudge 1% following Trump’s tweet. But they quickly bounced back. So maybe the effect of Trump’s fury only goes so far.

That’s gonna come back to haunt you…

id-100445331

Image courtesy of aechan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Speaking of which…Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank played nice with Trump so of course, it’s now going to cost him. Literally. During an interview on CNBC’s “Fast Money Halftime Report,” host Scott Wapner asked the athletic apparel chief executive about his involvement in Trump’s initiative to create manufacturing jobs in the United States. Some of the pearls that escaped Plank’s mouth included, “To have such a pro-business president is something that is a real asset for the country…People can really grab that opportunity.” [cue crickets chirping]. Naturally, Under Armour had to issue a statement to clarify Kevin Plank’s remarks – lest anyone think that he really meant what he said, which would lead to a boycott. Except that sort of already happened as “Boycott Under Armour” hashtag made its way into the Twitter-sphere in no time. In the meantime, UA insisted that it engages in “policy, not politics” and Plank’s statements had to do with job creation.  I shall spare you the details of official company statement – you’re welcome! – but rest assured it included all the usual themes about the beauty of unity, diversity, welcoming immigrants etc. The fact is, UA can’t afford any boycotts, whether Plank meant what he said or not. Its shares have been falling lately and in its most recent earnings report, the company missed expectations and forecasted slower growth for 2017.

And here’s one more reason to hate Wells Fargo…

id-100268140

Image courtesy of iosphere/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In case you weren’t incensed enough by Wells Fargo’s fraudulent account scandal, CEO Tim Sloan said that the bank is committed to helping the Dakota Pipeline project. While it would be nice to focus all rage on Wells Fargo, who loaned $120 million toward this project, the fact is the bank is just one of 17 that gave loans to help fund the $3.8 billion project. Obama had initially halted the project, but President Trump swiftly reversed that action and is looking forward to its completion. Come June, the pipeline is expected to ship half a million barrels of crude every day from North Dakota to Illinois. Unfortunately the 1,200 mile pipeline cuts through an Indian reservation with deep cultural significance, and it’s likely the pipeline will incur damage on the site. The pipeline also poses major environmental hazards where it crosses the Missouri River. The Standing Rock Sioux reservation is downstream from the crossing and the pipeline could end up polluting the Tribe’s drinking water. The Seattle Council is doing its part to combat Wells Fargo’s involvement by pulling about $3 billion in city funds.  Seattle has a contract with the bank that expires in 2018, and it most definitely will not be renewed. In the meantime, the council is on the hunt for a more “socially responsible bank.” Good luck with that one.

Advertisements

Supreme Smackdown to Apple; Wall Street Bonuses Shrink, But I’d Still Take One; Amazon Store: The San Diego Sequel

Un-appealing…

ID-10082409

Image courtesy of duron123/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Not everyone has the ability to say no to one of the world’s most valuable companies. But the Supreme Court did just that to Apple when it graciously told its lawyers that it was not interested in hearing its appeal on an earlier ruling from June of 2015. Now, the iPad maker has to pony up some $450 million for its role in conspiring with publishers to increase book prices that apparently violated Federal antitrust laws. Apple feels that this ruling will “chill innovation and risk taking.” Maybe. But consumers still didn’t appreciate the way that Apple caused e-book prices to go from $9.99 to $12.99 and $14.99. Except Apple didn’t act alone, bringing in Hachette Book Group, Harper Collins, Penguin, Simon & Schuster and MacMillan to help fleece e-readers everywhere. Basically, any publisher from whom you’ve ever read a book helped facilitate this antirust breach. Apple wanted to make sure the iPad got a nice little boost when it made its grand debut in 2010. So publishers got to set the price they wanted for e-books on Apple devices and in return Apple would enjoy a 30% cut of sales. This, my friend, is the nefarious practice known as “agency pricing.” Publsihers played along because they didn’t like that the price of e-books on Amazon was going down and this method provided a convenient way to recoup that cash. The publishers started charging Amazon the same prices that it charged Apple, forcing Amazon to raise its prices also. Apple will pay $400 million to e-book customers in the form of credits, in addition to $20 million to the thirty states that sued. Of course, that doesn’t include the $30 million in legal fees that Apple’s lawyers get to collect or the changes that Apple is being forced to make to its business practices.

Whose your daddy…

ID-100263186

Image courtesy of duron123/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli released some pricey data for one of New York’s top industries: Securities. Not that this will have you shedding tears, but the average Wall Street bonus fell 9% for 2015, checking in at $146,200. And while most people don’t come close to making that kind of cash in a year, the average Wall Street-er scored that, in addition to his or her salary. While that salary might seem high, consider that in 2006, the average Wall Street bonus was $191,360. And even though a whopping $25 billion worth of bonuses were awarded in 2015, it was 6% less than the previous year, as profit from broker-dealer operations dropped $1.7 billion to $14.3 billion. Profits for the six biggest banks hit $93 billion, by the way, which is more than 35% higher than the previous year. If you can believe it, that figure is still not as high as it should be and signals that the economy is still having a hard time bouncing back from 2008’s fiscal crisis. If you’re thinking about a career in securities, that might not be such a bad idea as the average Wall Street salary rose 14% in 2015 to $404,800. Except that prospects for 2016 look a bit grim and are actually expected to drop. There are approximately 172,400 people employed in the securities industry and 4,500 jobs were added in 2015. That figure, however, is still 8% less than it was pre-2008 fiscal crisis. By the way, these figures, we are warned, are not accurate estimates since they don’t include stock options and other forms of deferred compensation. The numbers also don’t include those for securities employees outside of New York City.

Isn’t it ironic…

ID-10020196

Image courtesy of duron123/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Mega e-commerce site, Amazon, arguably best known for being the largest online marketplace in the U.S. – not to mention some really great television –  is poised to open its second brick-and-mortar store where it will sell books, naturally, in addition to its own comprehensive line of tablets and devices. In fact, there will be nothing in the store that you wouldn’t be able to purchase on the company’s website. Rumors of the brick-and-mortar first surfaced when a big sign went up during the summer over the vacant space in a swanky San Diego mall. Then, last month, job postings for the 7,500 square foot store began appearing. Amazon’s store will be in good company as Tesla and Apple will be its mall neighbors. Meanwhile, the revenue expected from setting up an actual store isn’t expected to leave any meaningful dent in the company’s earnings. I guess it’s just a cute gesture for people who prefer to leave their homes to enjoy an actual physical shopping experience.

William Shatner Wants $30 Billion for Water; Harley-Davidson’s Wall Street Hits and Misses; Under Armour Needs to Bulk Up Projections

Rain rain don’t go away…

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Leave it to Star Trek legend William Shatner to take California’s drought emergency straight to Kickstarter. The 84 year old actor and Priceline shiller wants people to beam him up some cash – $30 billion’s worth, to be exact – so that a  four foot above ground pipeline can be built from Seattle to Nevada’s Lake Mead. The fact that Seattle doesn’t have a surplus of water to really be giving out to California, which is in its fourth year of drought, doesn’t seem to bother Shatner much. I’m guessing he didn’t ask officials in Seattle their thoughts on the idea. California Governor Jerry Brown has already issued a drought emergency and apparently there is about a year’s supply of water left. Mr. Shatner isn’t entirely convinced himself that he can even raise the $30 billion needed to build the pipeline but he is hoping to raise awareness on the issue. “If I don’t make 30 billion, I’ll give the money to a politician who says, ‘I’ll build it.’ I don’t think that last part is the best idea Mr. Shatner has ever had, but its sure to get a few people talking.

Not so hog wild…

Image courtesy of dan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of dan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Profits for iconic Hog maker, Harley Davidson, are up thanks to a somewhat reduced tax rate. So why the sad faces on Wall Street over the price of its shares? Because those very shares took a 6% hit today over revenue that fell 3.4% to $1.51 billion, down from $1.57 billion a year ago. The bike makers also revised forecasts that have less bikers getting on those legendary two-wheeled machines. Harley-Davidson initially expected to deliver between 282,000 – 287,000 Hogs this year. But now that range is looking closer to 276,000 – 281,000 orders. Some of that, of course, can be attributed to that annoyingly strong U.S. dollar that seems to be sucking the fun from just about every company’s earnings these days. But Harley-Davidson has also had to deal with competitors  – hard to believe that anyone can compete with a Harley – who have been offering better discounts and totally messing with the motorcycle company’s earnings. The good news is that the motorcycle brand still took in $270 million and $1.27 per share, even though analysts only expected $1.24 per share. Can someone please get those analysts on a Harley? A year ago the Hogs pulled in about $265 million at $1.21 per share.

Dude, what gives?

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Under Armour came out with earnings today and informed those that matter that it hit its revenue targets and raised its outlook. The Maryland-based athletic company even has PGA Masters Winner Jordan Spieth shilling for it. Under Armour also pulled in 5 cents per share on revenues of $805 million when analysts only called for $802.5 million. The apparel division grew 21% while the footwear division grew 41%. So why are investors still not satisfied with the athletic apparel company’s earnings? Here’s where things get dicey. Even though Under Armour raised its outlook for revenues from $3.76 billion to $3.78 billion, investors, analysts and others who throw large sums of money at the company expected higher projections of $3.82 billion in revenues. That $.o4 billion difference put a damper on the morning for many investors. Hence the stock took a bit of a hit this morning. Nothing major, just a few percentage points, but enough to put several Wall Street-ers in a bit of a snit.