Beer Companies Foam Up to Take Over the World; Colorado Ditch Day for Marijuana Tax; Poor Findings from U.S. Census Bureau

Sudsy…

Image courtesy of Danilin/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Danilin/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

A frothy beer merger seems to be brewing for two of the biggest beer makers in the world. Rumor has it that ABInBev and SABMiller are throwing around the idea of possibly joining foamy forces to create the biggest beer company. Ever. The move could also result in forming one of the biggest food and beverage companies. Ever. If the merger goes through, the new company would control a mind-numbing half of the entire beer market’s total profits. The new entity will also become one of the top ten biggest companies in the world, with Procter & Gamble and Nestle SA trailing behind. How a beer company’s market cap could surpass that of companies which make toothpaste and chocolate is beyond me. But I digress. ABInBev owns a lot beers you know like perennial classics, Budweiser, Corona and Stella Artois. But it also owns a lot that you may not have heard of like Antarctica, which is brewed…wait for it…in Brazil. Together with the malodorous Cass beer from South Korea, AbInBev owns over 40 different brews from all over the world. However it’s the market in Africa that has eluded this beer behemoth all this time. Hence, it’s looking to expand with SABMiller who already has quite the handle on that continent. Even though this is still all just talk, news of the potential merger sent shares of SABMiller up 23%.

On a high note…

Image courtesy of Paul/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Paul/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

There’s nothing like a good old-fashioned accounting error to generate marijuana sales. Because of a glitch in Colorado State Tax laws an automatic suspension of new taxes was conveniently triggered. The marijuana tax was the lucky winner and was met with great enthusiasm by the state’s marijuana users who regularly shell out an extra 25% in taxes for the stuff. It all started because Colorado under-estimated tax collection from last year. When that happens…poof…25% in sales and excise taxes magically disappears for one special day. Today being that day. Mason Tvert, director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project said, “It’s crazy how much revenue our state used to flush down the drain by forcing marijuana sales into the underground market…It’s even crazier that so many states are still doing it…” Amen. Also interesting to note (well, to me anyway) is that sales of marijuana outpaced those of alcohol and tobacco. With marijuana raking in tax revenues of $70 million, alcohol only managed to eke out a paltry $42 million in tax revenue. Marijuana users spend approximately $1,800 a year on the stuff while consumers spend $450 on alcohol and just $315 a year on tobacco.

On a low note…

Image courtesy of  Mister GC/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Mister GC/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Just when you think things are starting to look fiscally up, the U.S. Census Bureau steps in to to ruin the day. The bad news is that the median household income has been going down. As in, not up. In 2013, median income in the United States was $54,462. That number should have gotten bigger. But alas, 2014 brought with it a median income of $53,657. Which makes no sense since the economy seems to be recovering and employment is hovering at seven year lows (even though wages haven’t been picking up any speed). If that’s not bad enough, the poverty rate has also gone up from 14.5% in 2013 to 14.8% in 2014. Apparently, the poverty rate and the median income are not considered statistically significant, at least according to the Census Bureau researchers who presumably, make more than $53,657 a year. Just saying. And because it wouldn’t be any fun not to inject some politics into this discussion, the Democrats are rejoicing since the number of people roaming the streets without health insurance fell from 42 million people to 33 million. In an attempt to sap their mojo, however, Republican Paul Ryan, who chairs the House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee, advised Dems not to pat themselves on the back just yet, since clearly their efforts to fight poverty aren’t working.

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Snapchat’s latest News it and Lose it Feature; American Airlines Earnings Soar; Dow’s Downer of Day

Snap to it…

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Maybe Snapchat’s $10 billion valuation isn’t so crazy after all now that the disappearing messaging app has introduced its latest – and possibly greatest – feature, Discovery. This new feature is going to offer bite-sized bits of news giving the user  several options to get more on a story all with the convenient, effortless swipe of a finger. And then, true to Snapchat tradition (and technology), the stories will last for 24 hours before…you guessed it, they vanish into thin virtual air. A slew of media companies are already partnered with the app, including (but not limited to) CNN, ESPN and Yahoo News. The hope is that this little partnership will take that younger, hipper audience of 100 million monthly active users (and counting) and turn them into traditional news enthusiasts. Then there’s the ad revenue aspect. Gotta love those ads (and the revenue they hopefully bring in). Snapchats plans to post ads and then split the revenue with its media partners.

Things that make you go hmmm…

Image courtesy of vectorolie/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of vectorolie/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

American Airlines had a very good year and I can assure you I had nothing to do with it. The company posted its fourth quarter earnings regaling us with the news that it scored $597 million in net income. That number was particularly impressive since last year at this time the company posted a $2 billion loss. To be fair, (and I hate it that I have to be fair to American Airlines) that loss was because of one-time costs from its merger with US Airways and from its bankruptcy case. American Airlines also hooked in $1.1 billion in earnings with $1.52 per share, beating Wall Street’s estimates by a single, solitary cent. American Airlines can thank dropping fuel prices for some of its impressive earnings and the company plans to take a chunk of its $2.9 billion profit to update its pre-historic fleet and raise salaries. But if you’re hoping for a drop in fares, don’t hold your breath. It’s not happening.

Dow and out…

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today’s blizzard/storm had nothing on the Dow’s performance today which looked particularly disastrous with no thanks to some of the world’s biggest companies taking huge hits. Microsoft takes the number one spot with more than a 9% hit on its stock price today, despite the fact that it beat earnings estimates by 4%. Investors just didn’t see the growth, sales and transitioning that they expect from the once powerful and mighty software company. Oh well. Caterpillar takes the number two spot with a 7% hit on its shares. The company missed earnings expectations by $0.20. As prices for copper, coal and iron ore come down, there is less demand for mining equipment, which is precisely what Caterpillar does. The fact that the dollar is stronger than most other currencies is also putting a crimp in the Dow today. Procter & Gamble, is among those companies whose lousy earnings took a nasty 3.8% hit in its stock price, in part, because of this strong dollar of ours.  Other companies that have seen better days on the Dow include: Intel, Cisco, IBM, Nike. But alas, the list does not end there.

Steel Numbers, Medicare Lottery? and Has Your Mars Bar Gone to the Dogs

Steel yourself…

Image courtesy of Baitong333/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Baitong333/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It was big fun on Wall Street today with a slew of companies announcing their earnings. But the one everyone was waiting to hear from was Alcoa. In keeping with unofficial tradition, the global aluminum company, Alcoa, kicked off the first quarter earnings season by announcing their earnings on Tuesday afternoon. And wouldn’t you know it – they beat the Street’s predictions and were up by $0.09 per share. Wall Street loves Alcoa because when Alcoa goes up, it’s a pretty sure bet that a whole bunch of other companies are going to follow. Of the 21 companies that announced earnings, 11 beat the Street, two were right on target and eight got beat by the Street.

Doctor Moneybags…

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Back in 2012, Medicare reimbursed close to 900,000 healthcare professionals to the tune of $77 billion. The average provider received $87,883. But not West Palm Beach opthomalogist Salomon Melgen. He seemed to have won the Medicare lottery, getting reimbursed around $21 million. It must be because he’s a superior doctor, right? But he wasn’t the only one making a some major cash as six more doctors also surpassed the $10 million mark. Minor things like that got the government a tad bit suspicious that maybe people were committing fraud. Yeah, I know. Hard to believe. So after years of secrecy, the beans have finally been spilled and detailed records are being released as to who got reimbursed and for just how much. Oh and btw, Dr. Melgen is involved in a criminal inquiry with a US senator.

Nothing to bark at…

Image courtesy of Grant Cochrane/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Ū Image courtesy of Grant Cochrane/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In the $74.5 billion industry we call pet food, Mars, maker of some of your most beloved candy bars, decided to sell off their dog and cat kibble division. Procter & Gamble picked it up for a hearty $2.9 billion thereby adding brands, including Iams, Eukanuba and Natura brands, to their established canine and feline menus. While I am certain the fine folks at Mars are totally down with our four-legged friends, the fact is their pet food division wasn’t really bringing in enough cash to make it a keeper. By selling off the pet food division they can now free up some of that cash for research and development and also share the new found wealth with some very lucky shareholders, many of whom, I am certain, make wonderful companions to their furry friends.