Pharmaceutical Phraud; Yellen for a Hike; Wells Fargo-away

There’s a fungus among us…

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There’s another pharmaceutical company today that’s in big trouble today and this time it has nothing to do with EpiPens. Today’s alleged fraudulent crimes are brought to us by former Valeant Pharmaceutical Inc. executive Gary Tanner and defunct Philidor Pharmaceutical Services LLC chief executive Andrew Davenport. Tanner and Davenport allegedly participated in a fraud and kick-back scheme that netted the two tens of millions of dollars. Gosh who knew the pharmaceutical industry could be such a hot bed for illicit activity? The two execs apparently didn’t disclose to insurers that the two companies were connected. Valeant played the part of the big fancy drug company and Philidor played the supporting role of the mail-order pharmacy that conveniently helped boost sales of Valeant’s drug offerings by making sure they filled Valeant prescriptions. Philidor graciously assisted patients in getting insurance coverage for considerably pricier Valeant drugs instead of cheaper alternatives. In the meantime, Philidor would then request to be reimbursed by the insurance companies. Davenport apparently scored over $40 million from the scheme while Davenport only walked away with a paltry $10 million worth of kickbacks. Clearly he needs to hone his fraud “A” game. The scheme ran from December 2012 until September 2015 with the criminal complaint being filed in Manhattan Federal Court. Back in August of 2015, Valeant’s stock hit an all-time closing high of $262.52. But it should come as no surprise that the stock has since lost more than 80% of its value for a number of reasons, each worse than the next. The stock was trading under $18 today.

1-2-3 hike!

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Janet Yellen (thankfully) stole the Wall Street spotlight from Donald Trump today announcing that a rate hike “could well become appropriate relatively soon.” Loosely translated, it means it could and most likely will happen soon so feel free to hold your breath. The decision not to raise the rate at the last meeting was because the labor market still wasn’t quite where the Fed wanted to see it.  But now things are looking up…fiscally speaking, that is, and with steady job growth, wage gains and signs that point to firming inflation, that rate hike is looking like a done deal. But I guess we’ll have to wait until December 13-14, the date of the Fed’s next meeting, to see when that move might officially happen. As for Janet Yellen herself, she stayed mum on the presidential election but said she plans to stay on in her post until January of 2018, when her term officially ends. Many assumed that Yellen would resign once Trump was elected considering he’s not exactly a fan of her monetary policies.  But the Dove of Wall Street let ’em know that she’s staying put, Trump or not.

Cry me a river…

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Wells Fargo is getting some heavy doses of fiscal karma as it reported today that there were 44% fewer new account openings in October of 2016, compared to October 2015. That’s in addition to a 27% drop just from last month. As for credit card applications, those dropped by half to just 200,00 in October. There was a 3% increase in customer initiated closings over previous months as well. Because after all, why wouldn’t you choose to close an  account that you didn’t choose to open in the first place? However, Wells Fargo was at least savvy enough to make such predictions as October marked a full month since the lid was blown off the bank’s unauthorized accounts scandal as the settlement was disclosed on September 8 to the whopping tune of $185 million. But at least the bank finally and wisely decided to chuck sales goals for consumer bankers which were the primary culprit that ultimately led to the scandal. As for former CEO John Stumpf, he’s a free agent now, not that anyone’s going to be checking out his LinkedIn profile anytime soon.

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Macy’s Banks on Closures; Alibaba’s Boffo Quarter; Unvaliant Valeant

Winning…

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Shares of Macy’s soared today as investors gleefully cheered the retailer’s decision to close 15% of the company’s 728 stores. Presumably not as gleeful are the employees who work in those stores. While the locations of the closures have not been announced, many of those employees will be given a severance, provided they qualify, or be given the option to relocate. The stores to be shuttered have been costing an annual  $1 billion in annual sales. And in the face of online competition, that $1 billion could be put to better use like beefing up Macy’s e-commerce and finding bigger and better ways to further improve the better-performing stores. With Macy’s looking to invest in a “winning customer experience,” the company plans to bring in more brand shops and host a slew of in-store events that will hopefully drive traffic into the stores. Macy’s 2Q results saw sales fall about 4% to almost $6 billion in revenue with 54 cents added per share. To be fair, it did beat expectations of $5.8 billion in revenue with 45 cents added per share. But a strong dollar, off-price stores, bad-weather and less tourism didn’t help matters. Don’t knock the tourist angle; those visitors account for 5% of Macy’s annual sales.

More winning…

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China’s economy might be struggling but you’d never know it judging from Alibaba’s most recent earnings. The e-commerce giant posted its best revenue growth since its auspicious IPO back in 2014. Revenue grew a mind-blowing 59% from the same time last year to…wait for it…$4.8 billion. That impressive revenue figure was even more impressive if only because more money was made from mobile shopping than from PC’s. Talk about seismic shifts. Interestingly enough, the value of the goods it sells, aka gross merchandise value, only grew by about 24%. And like all good earnings reports, shares went up today on Wall Street. Profit for the e-commerce giant came in at $1.3 billion, a 71% increase over last year, with 74 cents added per share. Analysts only expected shares to increase by 63 cents. Monthly active users increased by 39% from the same time last year. It’s not just that the amount of monthly active users went up, but also that the average Alibaba user opens the app approximately seven times per day. Which probably explains why they account for 75% of the company’s sales.

There’s a fungus among us…

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There’s nothing like a criminal probe to completely throw your shares under the fiscal bus.  Today’s probe is brought to us by Valeant Pharmaceuticals, purveyor of everybody’s favorite toe-nail fungus treatment, Jublia. The burning question is whether Valeant had a very special relationship with a specialty pharmacy that helped inflate its drug prices. The specialty pharmacy at the heart of the probe is, or rather was, Pennsylvania-based Philidor Rx Services. Investigators suspect the mail-order pharmacy and Valeant were a little too close for comfort as far as insurance and wire fraud is concerned. It seems that Philidor wasn’t being entirely truthful to insurers about its relationship with Valeant so that it could sell lots of Valeant drugs at prices that seemed rather high. Distributors, in this case Philidor, are supposed to be completely neutral, yet Philidor seemed anything but, with almost all of its products that it sold coming from Valeant.  These days, however, Valeant (conveniently) says it didn’t condone Philidor’s practices. Valeant naturally neglected to mention the very large role it played in those practices. Incidentally, sales of Valeant dermatological products plunged since Philidor went the way of the dinosaur and now Valeant is staring in the face of $30 billion of long-term debt and a market value that plunged by 90% in the last twelve months. As criminal charges loom large, brass at Valeant have booted CEO Michael Pearson and overhauled the board of directors in a  seemingly desperate bid to restore investor confidence. Good luck with that one.