Japanese Airbag Maker Goes Bust; Pandora CEO Sings the Blues; ‘Pharma Bro’ Goes on Trial

Deflated…

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Japanese airbag maker, Takata Corp has filed for bankruptcy.  In the United States. Sure  companies file for bankruptcy almost everyday. But what makes this one unique is that Takata has the dubious distinction of issuing the largest auto-industry recall. Ever. With over 40 million vehicles in the U.S. possessing the potentially deadly airbags, some 125 million vehicles have been and will be recalled by 2019. It’s also the largest bankruptcy of a Japanese manufacturer, and one that finds itself staring down the wrong end of billions of dollars worth of losses over recalls that lasted the better part of a decade. From paying settlements to individuals who were harmed, to paying car makers, including Honda, BMW and Toyota – to name just a few – Takata’s fiscal trouble will take years to reverse. It seems that Takata’s faulty products were the cause for at least 16 deaths – that we know of. Fortunately a Chinese company had the good sense to swoop in and acquire Takata for a whopping $1.6 billion. Although, that is apparently a thorn in the side of the Japanese, since selling off to foreigners is something the country would rather like to avoid. Incidentally, the Chinese company that bought Takata is called Key Safety Systems and is based right here in the U.S. Go figure.

Cue the goodbye music…

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Looks like the music’s gone for Pandora CEO and Co-founder Tim Westergren. His departure may – or may not – have something to do with Sirius XM’x recent purchase of a $480 million, 16% stake in Pandora. But rumor has it that investors are bummed because they wanted Sirius to buy up the whole operation. If you recall, and it’s okay if you don’t, Howard Stern makes his radio home at Sirius. Not that this has anything to do with Westergren’s exit either. To add insult to injury, shares jumped a little on the news of Westergren’s impending departure, signaling that investors are stoked about his exit.  That itty bitty jump must have been especially welcome since Pandora’s stock has been down over 35% this year.  After all, Pandora is staring at some fierce competition from Spotify, Apple and JZ’s Tidal, to name just a few. As of yet, no replacement has been named so if you’re looking to throw your hat into the ring, now might be your chance.

What a pill…

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The time has come for everyone’s least favorite Pharma bro’ to head to court. And thus Monday begins with Martin Shkreli finding himself in a Brooklyn Fraud courthouse instead of a beach mansion in the Hamptons. But considering he raised the price of a life-saving drug by 5000%, he might very well go down as the least sympathetic defendant to ever sit in that courtroom. And just so ya’ know, being an a–hole isn’t crime and it’s not the reason why pharma-gazillionaire Shkreli is sitting in a courtroom on this fine summer day.  Rather ‘Pharma bro’ is on trial because prosecutors charged him with “widespread fraudulent conduct” and running a ponzi-like scheme that had him lying to investors while working at a hedge fund and his drug company.  Fun-fact: Shkreli was banned from Twitter back in January after harassing a female journalist who wrote an op-ed criticizing Donald Trump. Oh, the irony.

Oil-Vey! Glut Messing with Global Economies; Apple Sets its Sights on India; Who Will Represent the “World’s Most Hated Man”?

Dow-n and out…

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The Dow took a nasty 400 point fall today fueled (a little pun intended) in large part because of the oil glut that’s got barrels of the not-as-hot commodity trading at about $27.50 a pop – a very low low price. The S&P also fell as stocks were trading much lower. In fact, more than 1,000 New York Stock Exchange stocks hit 52 week lows, while on the other side of the pond, European and Asian markets followed suit, performing just as badly on seeing oil hit thirteen year lows. Experts (I am not one of them) are thinking we’re on the threshold of bear market territory – a nasty fiscal phase where market index prices are falling so much that people just want to sell off what they’ve got. Considering that the MSCI All Country World Index (which is basically a global market index mash-up) fell 2.4%, that just might be the case. China’s flailing economy and the United States’ strong dollar aren’t helping matters. Even Royal Dutch Shell is expecting profits to tank 42% to around $1.6 billion – a brutal cry from the $3.3 billion it reported last year at this time. But box-office fave Leonardo DiCaprio isn’t crying for Shell, or any other oil producers for that matter. At the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, where the A-lister was receiving some award, he graciously lashed out at big oil and corporate greed calling them, “Those entities with a financial interest in preserving this destructive system…covered up the evidence of our changing climate.” Hey! Maybe he’ll use that in his Oscar acceptance speech…

An Apple a day…

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It took awhile but Apple is now working to bring its tech magic to India where the Cupertino, California-based company finally finally filed an application with the Indian government to set up shop there. No word yet on how many stores it plans on opening or even how big of an investment it’s going to be. Of course, Apple products are already available in the country that boasts the second largest telecom market in the world. But in order to buy those products, consumers purchase the merchandise through a network of Indian-owned distributors. There are some who feel that Apple had been willfully ignoring India since it took this long to make the leap there. But Apple argues otherwise saying that restrictions on foreign investment in the retail sector weren’t exactly winning them over. India typically requires a single brand  – in this case, Apple – to locally procure 30% of its goods sold in the country. But rumor has it Apple brass had a little conversation with the Indian authorities to ease up on things.  Also India, unfortunately, doesn’t have the boffo spending power of say, China, where people pounced on iPhones from day one. In India, cheaper alternatives dominate the smartphone market while Apple only has about a 2% market share on the devices.  Apple, however, had been trying to make its products more affordable by offering buyback programs, installment programs and giving discounts on older phones. And then something wonderful happened – Apple sales in India crossed the $1 billion mark back in March and the tech company presumably began to see things differently.  The fact that India has the fastest growing smartphone market and is poised to take over the number two spot from the United States (China is first, duh) in 2017 might also have something to do with the change of heart.

Dumb and dumber…

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Martin Shkreli aka “Pharma bro”is switching lawyers though, why exactly remains a mystery. Marcus A. Asner, an attorney at the soon-to-be-ex firm of Arnold & Porter did not give an explanation as to why the change was being requested but he was probably not broken up that he will no longer represent what many call the world’s most hated man. Shkreli, 32, by the way, takes exception to that moniker, as he mentioned in a recent interview. But considering he raised the price of a life-saving drug by 5000% – well, what else are you gonna call him?  Perhaps we should give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he needed the extra cash so that he could buy the only known copy of a Wu-Tang Clan Album for $2 million. Just kidding. He has multiple accounts at multiple brokerage firms. Shkreli says that the lawyer switcheroo has nothing to do with the interview he did with The New York Times and called the explanation  a “dumb theory.” But you know what’s really dumb? Raising the price of a single pill from  $13.50 to $750.00. Shkreli, who is charged with blowing investors’ cash on some bad trades and then taking money out of his pharmaceutical company to pay for those trades said “the government’s case is fictitious.” He has pleaded not guilty to securities fraud and conspiracy.