Starbuck$$$ Coffee Buzz Gets Pricier; JPMorgan Ups the Minimum Pay Game; Drop in Job Openings Bums Out Economists

And then it happened…

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If there’s one thing you can rely on at Starbucks, besides the quality of their coffee, it’s that come July, the company will raise its prices. Today, the company did just that for the third year in a row. What Starbucks dubs as a “small price adjustment” shouldn’t be too bad. Well, that is, depending on what you purchased. Hey, if you don’t like it, blame rising coffee costs. And Starbucks, too, I suppose. The amount of Americans who drink coffee is expected to rise by 1.5%. The more people drink, the more the beans cost. Just another case of supply and demand, my friend. Prices went up between 10 cents to 20 cents on its brewed coffee, and between 10 cents and 30 cents on its espresso beverages and tea lattes. However, the price increases vary depending on which region you find your local Starbucks. In the grand scheme of things, purchases only actually increase by about 1%. Plus, the price went up on only 35% of its beverages. Which means that 65% of its beverages remain unchanged, price-wise, for those of you who shun change. But in all fairness, Starbucks is giving its employees a 5% raise come fall, not to mention doubling stock awards for employees who have been there for two years or more. Not that their raises and stock awards had anything to do with boosting the price of your chai latte, mind you.

Dimon in the rough…

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Starbucks isn’t the only company who is giving its hardworking employees a raise. Enter JPMorgan, the second most profitable company in the United States, who is about to give 18,000 of its employees a much appreciated boost in their paychecks. And this time, the employees aren’t even the ones who regularly rake in big bonuses. JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon will be raising the company’s minimum pay by 18% for employees who are mostly bank tellers and customer service representatives. These employees currently receive $10.15 per hour, but over the next three years will see increases of $12 per hour and then $16.50 per hour, depending on several factors. The company is also beefing up its in-house training programs as well, to the tune of $200 million, that will train thousands of entry level employees who work in consumer banking. Mr. Dimon says the new initiative is all about addressing concerns over income inequality, an issue that’s been getting a lot of negative attention, usually directed at Mr. Dimon and his peers. He also says it’s a way to attract and retain talent – an idea that company’s like Walmart, Target and McDonald’s have already started putting into practice. But leave it to the skeptics to whip out their negative spin and question if Dimon’s motives have more to do with a shrinking labor pool, and if JPMorgan is just getting ahead of an issue that might pose a problem in the future. The cost of raising the minimum pay by 18% will cost JPMorgan just about $100 million, which is just $7 million shy of the total 2015 compensation for Jamie Dimon and his four top-named executives.

Book of jobs…

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Even though JPMorgan and Starbucks are giving its employees more money to attract and retain great employees, the Bureau of Labor Statistics paints a very different employment picture. According to its latest report, job openings dropped to a five month low in May, with just 5.5 million jobs up for grabs, even though that same month also saw 5 million people getting hired. Not to be a downer, but that was the lowest rate since November 2014. At least voluntary quits fell to a 4 month low, with just 2.9 million leaving their jobs, presumably for better opportunities. Yet in April, job openings were at an all-time high. All these mixed numbers might just mean that the economy is not as healthy as we think it is. The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, a.k.a JOLTS, is the division of the Bureau of Labor Statistics that tracks job openings, hires and separations. The Labor Department, which reports just on job creation and unemployment, reported that employers only managed to create 11,000 new jobs in May. In case you’re wondering why that’s a bad thing, then consider that those 11,000 jobs were 25 times less than the amount of jobs created in May of 2015. At least the number of layoffs and firings in May fell to a ten month low of 1.67 million. Economists, however, still think these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt. Which is easy for them to say since they seem to be gainfully employed.

French Company Goes Organic for U.S. Acquisition; U.S. Airlines Gear Up for Cuba; U.S. Banks Bond Over Brexit

Let them eat organic cake!

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Dannon Yogurt’s parent company, Danone (said with a French accent) is looking to pick up  a major U.S company that will effectively double its size. That’s assuming all goes according to plan. Danone wants to offer organic food provider, WhiteWave, purveyor of favorites like Silk Almond and Soy Milk, Horizon Milk and Earthbound Farms, $10.4 billion in cash for the fiscal pleasure of its company. That’s a 24% premium over WhiteWave’s thirty day average closing price and comes out to about to $56.25 per share. But for Danone, whose looking to make itself a bigger presence in the United States, it’s well worth it, since WhiteWave’s offerings tend to attract wealthier consumers. WhiteWave generates annual sales of about $4 billion and with this acquisition, Danone expects to see a $300 million boost in operating profit. Danone has also been struggling in other parts of the world and this acquisition would ease the burden of some of those lesser-performing markets. FYI, when companies offer to buy other companies, their offers tend be at least at a 30% premium. Because this offer was not, it theoretically means that the bidding door is still open to other offers from companies like Coca Cola, PepsiCo and Kellogg Co, to name but a few. In a regulatory filing, though, WhiteWave did graciously say that it wouldn’t solicit other offers. However, there are exceptions. Should WhiteWave go with another offer, Danone still wins because it will get a $310 million break-up fee.

Bienvenido…

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Believe it or not, Hillary Clinton wasn’t the only topic of conversation today coming out of Washington DC. President Obama announced a proposal to allow eight U.S. airlines to provide nonstop service between Cuba and ten U.S. cities, beginning this fall. This will mark the first time in 50 years that travel of this kind will be available. And all this just one year after diplomatic relations were re-established. The city and airline selections were made by the Department of Transportation and the lucky airline winners are: Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Frontier Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Southwest Airlines, Spirit Airlines and United Airlines. American Airlines is actually no stranger to the island nation, as it has been offering charter services there since 1991. Just last year the airline made over one thousand chartered flights to Cuba, while JetBlue made over 200 chartered trips. That’s awfully welcome news for an industry that took a fiscal beating lately. The cities that can look forward to the new service had to have have substantial Cuban-American populations already in place. Hence, Florida finds itself the recipient of 14 out of the 20 daily nonstop flights, since it boasts the largest Cuban-American population. The cities include: Atlanta, Charlotte, Fort Lauderdale, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami,  Newark, New York City, Orlando and Tampa. According to Cuban officials, the number of American travelers to Cuba is up 84%, compared to last year, in just the first half of the year.  But there is still a trade embargo in place, which does include a travel ban. However, there are twelve convenient categories of reasons to fly to Cuba that you can check off should you decide to make your way to Havana any time soon.

Come together…

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It’s a fiscal kumbaya as four U.S. banks offered up their sincerest support for London following the Brexit vote. The gracious supporters include, JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Morgan Stanley. The banks agreed to help British Finance Minister George Osborne find ways to ensure that the U.K. remains the prominent financial player that it always was, pre-Brexit. And of course they all will try and find new and exciting ways to lure and retain big banking to London so that the consequences of the Brexit don’t do the country in completely. While that sentiment no doubt warmed the hearts of investors all over the world, the investment banks could not offer up as much optimism as far as the jobs situation is concerned. After all, “no one in their right mind would currently invest in Britain.” Keeping those jobs there might might be the biggest challenge of all and no one wants to make any promises on that. Especially Jamie Dimon, who had previously mentioned that around 4,000 jobs could make their way out of London. In the meantime, the French wasted no time – I mean NONE! – in announcing to the world that it would make its tax regime as enticing as possible, in a not at all subtle attempt to grab some pricey banking business from London.