UnFriendly Skies Take a Well-Deserved Beating; FY-Infosys – Americans Getting on Payrolls; Paid Internships vs. Actual Job

Turbulent…

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The day of reckoning has finally come for airlines and their awful and questionably lawful treatment of its passengers. If you recall, the impetus for this day stemmed from a recent United Airlines flight, where a passenger, David Dao, was forcibly dragged off a plane and left with a litany of injuries including a concussion and broken teeth. So over at the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee there was a hearing where airline execs insisted that they’ve been working to improve the situations that have been responsible for all the recent bad press. United CEO Oscar Munoz apologized again at the hearing for the recent tussle that cost his airline a presumably hefty settlement.  Of course plenty of blame has been pointed at unruly passengers. But then again who can blame them? Flights have gotten more crowded, equipment and tech failures have been resulting in delays on a fairly regular basis and obnoxious fees keep cropping up like a bad fungus. And don’t even get me started on the practice of over-booking flights. Apparently, a few airlines are rethinking their policies on that issue.  In the meantime, lawmakers are warning they’ll slap on major legislation if things don’t improve and they promise it wont be pretty.

Trump’d…

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A company based in India, with 200,000 employees worldwide, is now on the line to hire 10,000 workers in the U.S. Enter Infosys, one of a number of companies who engage in outsourcing – a four letter word according to the President – because the practice takes jobs away from Americans. Now, the company announced plans to open four new centers in the United States in the next two years. In the past, Infosys and other similar companies have relied on work visas for its employees. But now President Trump has ordered a major review and overhaul of that program. That’s expected to lead to some very unpleasant changes for companies who are used to employing foreigners in the United States, instead of tapping into the talent pool already present in the country. As for Infosys’s CEO, Vishal Sikka, who happens to be based in Palo Alto (oh, the irony), he explained that “…bringing in local talent and mixing that with the best of global talent in the times we are living in and the times we’re entering is the right thing to do. It is independent of the regulations and the visas.” Of course it is.

How do you like your coffee?

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If you’re not having the easiest time finding a job, maybe getting a position as an intern might be the better way to go. And leave it to Glassdoor to unearth the 25 highest paying internships in the United States. You see, the median annual salary in the U.S. for a full time worker is $51,350 – or about $4,300 a month. An internship gig at Facebook – provided you can even get one  – is worth $8,000 a month. Plus, as a Facebook intern, you get room and board, free food, transportation…Does it get any better than that? Just good luck. You’ll need it. Actually, you’ll really need computer science skills. But that’s besides the point. Microsoft comes in second with a paycheck that is about a thousand dollars less a month than what you’d get at Facebook. But former interns can’t stop raving about the projects they got to work on. Rounding out the third spot is ExxonMobil. While it’s not tech-related, it is a company that is highly focused on professional development of its interns. And who couldn’t use some of that? Amazon and Apple take spots fifth and sixth, respectively, and they’ll both keep you in style for about $6,400 a month. While the tech companies seem to dominate much of the list, there are still plenty of opportunities to map out a career in banking. If you’re sure that’s your thing.

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Tesla Deliveries Anything But Electrifying; Sec’y of State Nominee’s Future Looks Green; Trump’s SEC Chairman Pick

Not electrifying…

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Tesla’s fourth quarter sales rose 27%, yet deliveries fell short with CEO Elon Musk pointing to production delays. And Tesla didn’t fall short according to Wall Street’s predictions but rather its very own.  It may seem like a convenient excuse, but it’s a valid one that was also used to blame the company’s second quarter shortcomings. The electric car company delivered 22,000 cars in its last quarter, which was over 5,000 more than the same time last year. That might seem awfully impressive except that Tesla wanted that figure to top 25,000 vehicles. So now, that 3,000 car miss becomes an ugly smudge on the company’s fourth quarter earnings report. Tesla’s grand total of car deliveries for the year hit over 76,000. But once again, because Tesla went ahead and predicted that number would hit 80,000, it disappointed only itself.  Setting forecasts he just can’t meet is a nasty habit that Elon Musk can’t seem to break.  Production delays or not, maybe Tesla’s should stop trying to predict the future.  Shares were down 11% for 2016 which marks the first time that Tesla reported an annual decline since its 2010 IPO. But miraculously those shares still rose today because Wall Street clearly has a thing for Elon Musk. Well, his company, anyway.  Wall Street and consumers alike are waiting with bated breath to see if the much anticipated $35,000 Model 3 will actually surface this year. Some experts, however, think the more affordable model will only be making its grand debut in 2018. That still has’t stopped loyal Tesla buyers and enthusiasts from shelling out a total of $350,000 worth of deposits for the car.

Hatched…

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President-elect Donald Trump’s pick for Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, reached a very lucrative retirement deal with ExxonMobil. If Tillerson does in fact get confirmed – and that’s still kind of iffy – then he’ll walk away from his post with $180 million comfortably nestled in a trust account. And that’s the approximate value of Tillerson’s 2 million deferred shares of the energy giant. Because he would not be allowed to own shares of the company if he took the post, the shares would get cashed out and put into an independently managed trust account. Besides dumping his ExxonMobil shares, Tillerson will not be allowed to work in the oil and gas industries for a period of ten years. Plus, he has to give up a cash bonus and other benefits that are worth another $7 million because he won’t be there in March, when he’ll have reached the company’s official retirement age that affords him the opportunity to collect on that $7 million package. But, that $180 million ought to tide him over. He’ll also need to agree to sever ties in order to avoid any conflicts of interest. Should he decide to return to the industry, then all that money would be given to charities of the main trustee’s choosing. But I did write that his confirmation is”iffy” because there are plenty of Congressional members who aren’t down with Tillerson’s cushy relationship with Russian president Vladimir Putin. That’s going to come up a lot during the confirmation hearings and it’ll probably be ugly, if not wholly entertaining.

And I choose you…

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Trump just announced his pick for Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman and it’s one that should surprise…no one. Enter Jay Clayton, a lawyer with the law firm Sullivan and Cromwell, who has plenty of experience with banks. Well, representing them, anyway. Besides banking clients, Clayton also defended a variety of “large financial institutions” against such entities as the Department of Justice, other government agencies and regulators and – get this – even the SEC itself.  Some of his more notable achievements include representing everybody’s favorite Chinese e-commerce giant, Alibaba, when it made its grand IPO debut. He’s also represented Barclays when it unceremoniously scooped up Lehman Brothers, and Bear Stearns when JP Morgan took it on. You didn’t think we’d leave out Goldman Sachs, did you?  Because he repped that one too.  Word on the street is that Carl Icahn interviewed Clayton, along with several other candidates for the post. Presumably the two gentlemen discussed how to best undo obstructive banking regulations, Dodd-Frank and all those other pesky rules that have been casting a major downer on the financial world.

Oil-vey! Trump’s Secretary of State Pick Putin Us On; Trump vs. Silicon Valley; Rate Hike Sends Joy Throughout Wall Street

Energized…

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Trump’s latest pick, this time for Secretary of State, has naturally already ruffled more than a few political feathers. Enter Exxon Mobil Corp. CEO Rex Tillerson, a man who happens to be very very cushy with Russia and its fearless leader, Vladimir Putin. If you recall, Russia is very brazenly messing with Ukraine, to the point where the U.S. felt compelled to impose sanctions. Now, the CIA said the country also launched cyber attacks against the U.S. in an effort to influence the election results. But that very same country awarded Tillerson the Friendship Medal in 2013.  Tillerson, who has never held a public office, has been at Exxon, the world’s largest energy firm, for 40 years and during that time spent many many hours cultivating relationships and establishing major business deals with countless foreign countries and companies. But he’ll still need to be confirmed by the Senate. However, considering that former Secretaries of State Condoleeza Rice and James Baker are big fans, not to mention Defense Secretary Robert Gates, he shouldn’t have too much of an uphill battle. By the way, Condoleeza Rice also happens to be a consultant at Exxon Mobil, and Robert Gates was a consultant at one point too. Rumor has it that they all plan to vouch for the CEO.  Lindsay Graham and John McCain, however, are just not that into him, presumably because of his chummy relationship with Putin, of whom they are not particularly fond. Also not in Tillerson’s favor is the fact that Exxon currently has billions of dollars in deals with Russia, not to mention one valued at $500 billion that involves exploring and pumping for oil in Siberia. Those deals can only go forward if the U.S. decides to lift its sanctions against Russia and, fyi,  Tillerson was never much of a fan of the sanctions. And just so you know, according to a filing from a year ago, Tillerson owns $218 million in Exxon stock along with a $70 million pension plan. Shares of Exxon Mobil went up 2.2% on the news of Tillerson’s nomination.

 

Speaking of Trump…

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Tomorrow is a big day at Trump Towers as some of Silicon Valley’s top execs head over to the President-elect’s digs for a little quality time with Donald Trump. Expected to attend the power meeting are: Apple’s Tim Cook, Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, Microsoft’s Satya Nadella, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Tesla’s Elon Musk and Google’s Sergey Brin and Eric Schmidt…to name but a few. While the agenda’s not public, there are some predictions about what might be discussed tomorrow. There’s the not-so-minor issue of antitrust enforcement and those pesky government demands for user data. But much higher on that list is Trump’s immigration policies and how they have the potential to put a very major damper on the inner workings at many of these Silicon Valley companies. The fact that these companies bring in a lot of employees on special visas, not to mention that they also send plenty of jobs overseas, doesn’t exactly jibe well with Trump’s vision of “Making America Great Again.”  To be fair, Apple did say it has 80,000 employees in the United States and is also responsible for creating another 2 million jobs from all the business opportunities Apple creates. However, Trump did say, in his very eloquent way, that he wants to “get Apple to build their damn computers and things” right here.  Donald Trump is all for establishing major tax reforms and is acutely aware that all these tech companies have a lot of cash offshore. Major reform will help bring that cash back to the States. So its in everyone’s best interests to work together towards that goal, whether they supported Trump’s presidential aspirations or not. And for the record, they did not.

Stocks, and bonds and hikes…Oh my!

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Stocks all over the world rejoiced today by going up while the Dow Jones Industrial Average came thisclose to hitting the 20,000 mark following its 9% surge since Election Day. Actually, the index came within 50 points of the 20,000 mark which sent Wall Street into fits of fiscal joy. The S&P got in on the action by going up .8% to its very own all-time high. The reason for all this excitement is because the Federal Reserve is expected to officially and finally finally announce a rate hike tomorrow, marking the second time in ten years that we get to witness and take part in that elusive increase. Rate hikes are welcome since they signal that the economy is strong and steady in all the right ways. Low interest rates have this nifty little effect on stocks that makes them cost higher. Problem is low interest rates are just no good  for the savers among us who like high interest rates because of the income they get from bonds and bank accounts.  Even though borrowing costs are about to get that much higher, investors are still positively giddy at the prospect that the President-elect intends to usher in an era of potentially lower corporate tax rates, less regulation and lots more infrastructure spending.

 

Game on Oprah! John Oliver’s $15M Giveaway; Fortune 500 Companies’ Latest Surprises; Burberry Boss Paycheck Getting a Whole Lot Smaller

New queen of daytime…

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Move over Oprah. John Oliver just achieved god-status in the television talk show realm after buying nearly $15 million in medical debt and then forgiving it. Poof. Just like that. On his latest show “This Week Tonight with John Oliver,” the talk-show host took on the debt collecting/buying industry, which can be dubbed “shady” at best. Oliver said, “It is pretty clear by now (that) debt buying is a grimy business, and badly needs more oversight, because as it stands any idiot can get into it.” So John Oliver did “get into it,” and spent just $50 to start his very own debt collection company called Central Asset Recovery Professional aka CARP. It’s no coincidence, he pointed out, that the company is named after the bottom-feeding fish. Oliver’s company was almost immediately offered close to $15 million in medical debt from 9,000 Americans, social security numbers, names and addresses included, for just half a cent on the dollar. In case you were wondering, that came out to about $60,000. Then, with the simple push of a red button, John Oliver, forgave the debt, presumably with funds from his own bank account. But most importantly, Oliver easily trumped Oprah Winfrey’s 2004 television giveaway, when she gave out $8 million worth of cars to 276 audience members. And he didn’t even do it for ratings. Sort of.

Rank and file…

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Fortune Magazine’s annual list of the biggest 500 companies by revenue for fiscal 2015 is out and it was Netflix that was making big waves this year. The video streaming site, which launched in 130 new countries in January, and was the top fiscal performer for 2015, ticked up 95 spots to the 379th spot. However, while the climb was quite impressive, there are still 378 companies that rank higher than Netflix. Rounding out those top spots are Walmart, ExxonMobil, Apple and Berkshire Hathaway. No big surprises there. Apple, by the way, which moved up to two spots from last year’s fifth place, was the most profitable company on the list, earning $53 billion for fiscal 2015. Companies including GM, Ford and AT&T also cracked the top ten with Amazon landing at number 18 and Walgreens following close behind at number 19. Microsoft managed to crack the top 25 for the first time ever as Facebook climbed 85 spots this year to claim its 157th ranking. Interestingly enough, more than half of the companies on the list saw a drop in sales, with energy companies taking the biggest beating of all.

Pay raze…

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The CEO of Burberry Group PLC, Christopher Bailey, will now have to switch to generic brands when he goes grocery shopping. After failing miserably to post respectable earnings results, the dapper exec will watch as 75% his paycheck vanishes into thin air. The CEO, who also serves as the Chief Creative Officer – and herein, might lay the problem –  will earn a paltry $2.74 million this year, a far cry from the $10.8 million he scored last year. Shareholders are also withholding his bonus for missing profit targets. That might seem a bit harsh, but shareholders in hundreds of companies are getting fed up with massive executive salaries that are completely at odds with results. Bailey, however, is not the only executive at the company who will be experiencing the fiscal wrath of the Burberry shareholders. Executive directors at the fashion house will also be stripped of their bonuses this year, because after all, it’s not like Bailey was solely responsible for shares of Burberry taking a 35% hit in the last twelve months. Burberry has announced that it will implement a cost-cutting plan – that has little to do with Bailey’s pay cut – in addition to a share-buyback program. Prudent moves when a companies reports disappointing fiscal earnings. But the earnings may not be entirely Bailey’s fault. Consider that 40% of Burberry sales come from the Chinese, who are in the midst of their own fiscal woes.

Can’t Cap the Apple; Let It Go, Barbie. There’s A New Disproportioned Blond In Town; Tiffany & Co.’s Luxe Earnings

In case you missed it…

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Image courtesy of Ambro/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Apple can breathe a sigh of relief now that it is officially king of the world. Sort of. The tech company has officially surpassed the $700 billion mark of its market capitalization meaning it is now the most valuable company in the world. Make that universe. ExxonMobil, on the other hand, is not-so-prominently perched at the number two spot.  What this all means is that Apple’s outstanding shares are worth way more than all of ExxonMobil’s outstanding shares – by $300 billion. To put it in perspective, a tech company whose gadgets many people do not even own, is more valuable than an energy company whose commodity is consumed constantly by nearly every single person on the planet. Sitting in third place is Microsoft, with Johnson & Johnson nipping at its heels in fourth.

Let It Go?

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Image courtesy of digitalart/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Could it be? Is Barbie’s rock star status taking a hit? According to the National Retail Federation, the original, plastic, disproportioned blond has been unseated by “Frozen.” Anna, Elsa and company have become the number one go-to gift this holiday season putting Barbie in second place. The survey has been conducted for the last eleven years and this is the very first time in the survey’s history that Barbie is not  provocatively posed at the number one spot. The whole “Frozen” phenomenon has thus generated about $1.3 billion in sales, globally. Good news for Disney, bad new for Mattel, the company behind Barbie. What’s even worse news for Mattel is the fact that in 2016, Hasbro picks up the license for the “Frozen” dolls. If you happen to be  wondering what the number one toy boys will be getting, look no further than the Lego aisle.

Little blue boxes…

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Image courtesy of MR LIGHTMAN/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Just as I chucked my Tiffany & Co. catalog into the recycling bin, the luxury retailer posted its third quarter earnings. Unlike myself, apparently, many of you are not only not chucking the catalog in the recycling bin, but you are actually going into the pricey retailer and plunking down major wads of money for its very expensive merchandise – just not so much for their cheaper silver lines, interestingly enough.  In fact, here in America, sales were up 10%. Which is especially good since Asia doesn’t seem to be sharing America’s enthusiasm for the luxe jeweler where sales there were down 12%. Revenue did rise 5.2% to $957 million and $0.76 per share. However, analysts were expecting the company to rake in $0.77 per share on $969 million. Maybe the holiday season will help add a little more brilliance to Tiffany & Co.’s fourth quarter.