Michael Kors Department Store Diss; Disney Swims to Great 3Q; Ralph Lauren Hits and Misses and Hits

More bag for your buck…

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Michael Kors is biting back at the hand that feeds it: department stores. The accessories company is blaming them for its recent losses, fed up with the constant discounts department stores are putting on Michael Kors merchandise. In case you haven’t noticed there is nary a moment when Michael Kors products are not discounted. I dare you to prove that one wrong. The fact that consumers can use coupons for Michael Kors products? Ugh. Don’t even get them started. In fact, CEO John Idol is putting the kibosh on them and also chucking those friends and family discounts. Michael Kors reported a 7% drop in its first quarter wholesale business and is planning on shipping less merchandise to the stores in an attempt to reclaim some much-needed pricing power. Michael Kors feels that consumers forgot the value of its products. Seems like a prudent move considering that Macy’s, in particular, brings in the largest chunk of wholesale revenue for Michael Kors.  In any case, it’s a strategy that Coach also is beginning to employ, except that Coach also plans to pull out of about 250 stores completely. Earnings came in at $147 million and 88 cents a share on $988 million in revenue. That was a slight change from last year’s $174 million and 87 cents on $986 million. The fact that mall traffic and tourism were down didn’t help matters. Even same stores sales took a 7.4% hit, which was especially brutal since analysts only predicted a 4.2% decline. Still, analysts expected 74 cents on $953 million in revenue, so the earnings weren’t all that bleak in the first place.

It’s Dory’s world after all…

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Disney posted impressive earnings throwing a big shout out to its studio division, who cranked out the incredibly endearing and ridiculously, lucratively marketable “Finding Dory.” Okay, so marine life wasn’t the only reason since “The Jungle Book “and “Captain America: Civil War “also contributed to that success. Just not as much. Not nearly as much. In any case,  Disney particularly relished those 3Q earnings considering that its 2Q earrings missed the mark while this quarter it took in $1.62 per share, beating estimates by one penny. But not everything was coming up roses and clown fish at Disney, all because of ESPN and a future for it that looks more bleak than bright. Taking a beating from “cord-cutting” consumers who are giving the heave-ho to cable subscriptions and bundles, ESPN is, not surprisingly, rapidly losing subscribers. The network signed a $1 billion deal with BAMTech to find a way for ESPN to bring “direct-to-consumer ESPN-branded, multi-sports subscription streaming service.” Two words, ESPN: blue tang.

No medals for you…

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Even Michael Phelps couldn’t help win this one. Of course  I am referring to Ralph Lauren’s recent earnings that had the luxury brand posting a 7% sales loss. Ralph Lauren reported a loss of $22 million with 27 cents per share. That’s a far cry form last year when the company took in a profit of $64 million and 73 cents added per share. Revenue, which came in at $1.55 billion, took a hit, but analysts expected that hit to be closer to $1.77 billion so complaining wasn’t necessary. Shares still went up today so clearly these losses have done little to spook investors. That’s because those losses were expected as part of a strategic comeback plan engineered by Ralph Lauren CEO Stefan Larsson, who took over back in November. His grand plan also includes reducing turnaround times from design to shelves and to focus on Ralph Lauren’s core brands – initiatives that he thinks will generate roughly $180 million to $220 million in annual savings. That and closing about 50 stores should have Ralph Lauren returning to its fiscal glory in no time.

 

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Disney’s ESPN Not the Happiest Place on Earth; SEC Looks to Salary-Shame; Netflix and Microsoft Maternity-Leave Shami

Squeak squeak…

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Image courtesy of digitalrt/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The House of Mouse took quite the beating today on Wall Street but no animated rodents are to blame for this one. Instead we look to Disney-owned ESPN whose third quarter performance wasn’t victorious. The cable channel lost plenty of subscribers as consumers look to “cord-shaving” and “cord-cutting” their ever expanding cable bills. The fact is, when cable subscribers look to save money on their monthly expenses, ESPN is usually the first item to be sacrificed as it eats up $6 a month. Just ask the 3.2 million consumers who already dropped ESPN from their channel lineup. Of course, the network still has some 90 million subscribers but it’s not exactly sparking investor confidence because it’s got those investors wondering how ESPN could grow – and make money. At least Disney Chairman Bob Iger has some confidence left for the sports network. Someone should. But it wouldn’t be fair to only blame ESPN for the disappointing earnings. The strong dollar and declines at theme parks also added to the fiscal misery. So you see, it’s not all ESPNs fault. What a relief. Third quarter revenue hit $13.1 billion with $1.45 added per share, much to the disappointment of analysts who expected $13.2 billion. Disney hasn’t had an earnings miss in two years. You know what didn’t disappoint at Disney? “Age of Ultron” and “Cinderella.” That’s what. Together with sales of licensed products, those areas saw double digit percentage increases.

And you get to fly on the company jet?

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It’s not everyday the SEC and drama can be found in the same sentence. But now that day has come all because of a new SEC ruling that is stirring quite a bit of trouble. Under the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act, public companies now have to issue a “pay ratio disclosure” detailing the compensation of its CEO and the median compensation of the its average employee. Pay gap, anyone? With a 3-2 vote for the ruling, Republicans are against it saying that it will only serve to “name and shame” CEO’s and companies and has no use or relevance to investors. Democrats feel quite the opposite feeling it’ll help investors determine and vote on pay packages for CEO’s. Of course the groups out there that protest income inequality love the new ruling because it’ll highlight and bring all the right attention to their cause. Between 1978 and 2014, the average CEO pay went up almost 1000%. That, my cyber-friends, is what you call a surge. Problem is, according to the Economic Policy Institute, pay for average employees classified as “non-supervisory” only went up by less than 11%. Talk about discrepancies. Commissioner Daniel Gallagher, who voted against the ruling, argued it will wastefully cost approximately $1.3 billion just to implement the compliance and said, “To steal a line from (Supreme Court) Justice (Antonin) Scalia, this is pure applesauce.” How poetic.

Bundle of joy…

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Image courtesy of digitalart/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Netflix and Microsoft are trying to one-up each other only this time it has very little to do with tech and sales and more to do with babies. Microsoft just announced its updated maternity/paternity policy which now gives parents 20 weeks of full paid leave plus two weeks before a due date for short-term disability. But it’s not as generous as Netflix’s latest policy, dubbed “unlimited” which gives parents a whole year to be with their newest arrivals, allowing them to come and go and go and…well you get it, right? Netflix brass feel that it’s more important to “focus on what people get done, not on how many days worked.” These generous parental leave policies aren’t exactly trendsetting in Silicon Valley. Only for the rest of the country where the United States ranks dead last among 38 countries in government supported parental leave. But Netflix goes one further with its “unlimited vacation” policy too. “Netflix leaders set good examples by taking big vacations and coming back inspired to find big ideas.”  Great. Sign me up.

That’s Sue Bad! Wells Fargo Faces City Lawsuit; Disney’s Enchanted Earnings; Sprint One Step Forward, Two Step Backward

You don’t say…

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigital Photos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigital Photos.net

Try not to get too emotional now, but Wells Fargo is getting sued by the city of Los Angeles for…get this...fraudulent business practices. I know. Hard to believe. According to City Attorney Mike Feuer, “The largest California-based bank had a culture of high-pressure sales that pushed employees toward “fraudulent conduct.” Apparently some of the bank’s employees allegedly opened unauthorized accounts, misused confidential information and charged fees all in the name of sales. Wells Fargo is also accused of failing to notify its customers that their information was breached. Customers were charged fees, many of which ended up in collections and damaged their credit reports. Unauthorized accounts were opened using money from existing accounts. Wells Fargo says that it did have a few misbehaving employees in their midst who were either fired or disciplined for engaging in such appalling practices. The lawsuit is seeking $2,500 – $5,000 per violation and an end to these practices. A statement from the bank said, “Wells Fargo’s culture is focused on the best interests of its customers and creating a supportive, caring and ethical environment for our team members.” But when asked directly whether unauthorized accounts were opened, the bank was conveniently mum.

Charming…

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Image courtesy of jscreationzs/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

They don’t call it the happiest place on earth for nothing. Disney came out with its second quarter earnings which were up a very magical 10%. Much of that was from its parks and resorts, which were up 24% alone. It helps that Disney not so charmingly raised its prices on them. Shanghai Disneyland, scheduled to open next year, ought to add a little more drama in the fiscal quarters following its debut. Profit for the company came in at $2.1 billion and $1.23 per share. Analysts only expected $1.11 per share while last year the House of Mouse took in $1.9 billion. There was a downside. Sort of. ESPN’s carrying fees ate into a lot of that profit but because sports games are so insanely popular, Disney still managed to make some cash off of them. But no earnings report since 2014 would be complete without mention of the surprise runway hit movie from the magical kingdom of Arendelle. “Frozen” continues to be a constant source of fiscal joy as toys from the film keep flying off the shelves. Even though Disney has yet to repeat the magical quarter from whence “Frozen” was released, it is hoping “Avengers: Age of Ultron” will facilitate that, as its release of “Cinderella,” while taking in a charming $495 million, was no “Frozen.” But then again, what is?

Are you listening?

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Perhaps you recall Sprint’s recent promotions to get customers to switch over from Verizon and AT&T? One involved cutting bills from other carriers in half. I recall chainsaws being used in these commercials. Then there was the promotion where Sprint even offered to eat the cost of customers’ early termination fees from the aforementioned carriers. Well, those tactics almost paid off. Sprint picked up 1.2 million new subscribers in its fourth quarter, bringing its total subscribers to 57 million, and keeping it comfortably perched at the number three spot amongst wireless carries. It just barely beat T-Mobile. But the math didn’t quite work out so nicely and Sprint also took a loss of $224 million losing 6 cents per share. It’s particularly harsh since Wall Street was only expecting a loss of about 4 cents. Revenue was down $8.28 billion when analysts expected $8.5 billion and was a 7% drop from last year. So I guess the promotions are over. Or will be.

Snapchat-ting all the Way to the Bank; HSBC Is In Big Trouble, Yet Again; Virgin America’s Soarin Good Earnings

And just like that it disappears…

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Image courtesy of renjith krishnan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Hindsight is 20/20 but in Snapachat’s case it’s more like 19 – as in billions of dollars. The social media and messaging app, which very presciently declined Facebook’s offer to buy them for a paltry $3 billion back in 2013, is rumored to be adding an additional $500 million to its coffers. This will now peg the company at between $16-$19 billion and could make it the second most valuable privately held company behind Über technologies and Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi. Started in 2011 and helmed by CEO Evan Spiegel, the app allows users to post pictures and messages that disappear within a few seconds after being opened. Snapchat boasts 100 million users and it should come as no surprise that 57% of its users are under the age of 25. Of course, its disappearing act is not the app’s only trick as it now has deals with, among others, Yahoo, CNN, ESPN…the list goes on, tailoring content just for you. Even movie studios are getting in on the Snapchat action and before long you’ll see Snapchat’s very own superhero series. If that doesn’t scream street cred, then I don’t know what does.

Don’t bank on it…

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Image courtesy of scottchan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

There’s nothing like a little money laundering investigation to put a downer on your week. Well in HSBC’s case it’s “aggravated money laundering” which sounds so much more sinister than just plain old “money laundering.” This latest criminal investigation comes a week after the revelation that it helped some of its super wealthy clients and their 1,100 bank accounts, evade taxes. HSBC is on a roll, I tell you. Investigators suspected that if HSBC was helping its clients avoid paying taxes, then what else might it be helping their clients do? Hence, we have the money-laundering investigation.  A Swiss public prosecutor launched a criminal probe into the matter and has since raided the picturesque offices of HSBC. Good thing that former HSBC IT employee, Herve Falciani, very thoughtfully collected all those files pointing investigators into launching an investigation. Too bad he tried to sell the information first, though. That kind of looked bad for him. But probably not as bas as how it’s looking for HSBC right now. Of course, HSBC is said to be cooperating. Whatever that means. Do banks ever not cooperate?  HSBC did, however, sort of acknowledge it messed up on the tax evasion end blaming the fact that stringent standards weren’t in place as they should have been. You don’t say.

Flyin’ high…

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Image courtesy of hywards/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

If you’ve ever flown Virgin America, then it might come as no surprise (or maybe it will) that the airline just whipped Wall Street expectations with a little help from cheaper oil prices and fully booked planes. The airline only made its Wall Street IPO debut back in November but so far it has not disappointed as the airline took in $1.16 per share – a far cry from the 80 cents Wall Street expected it would earn. Revenue for the fourth quarter was $372.2 – a 3.4% increase over last year at this time, impressively taking down analyst estimates of $370.8 million. Started by billionaire Sir Richard Branson, the airline just announced big plans to give Southwest Airlines a very unwelcome run for its money by offering non-stop flights to Austin. Let’s just hope this little battle pays off for the passengers too.

Snapchat’s latest News it and Lose it Feature; American Airlines Earnings Soar; Dow’s Downer of Day

Snap to it…

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Maybe Snapchat’s $10 billion valuation isn’t so crazy after all now that the disappearing messaging app has introduced its latest – and possibly greatest – feature, Discovery. This new feature is going to offer bite-sized bits of news giving the user  several options to get more on a story all with the convenient, effortless swipe of a finger. And then, true to Snapchat tradition (and technology), the stories will last for 24 hours before…you guessed it, they vanish into thin virtual air. A slew of media companies are already partnered with the app, including (but not limited to) CNN, ESPN and Yahoo News. The hope is that this little partnership will take that younger, hipper audience of 100 million monthly active users (and counting) and turn them into traditional news enthusiasts. Then there’s the ad revenue aspect. Gotta love those ads (and the revenue they hopefully bring in). Snapchats plans to post ads and then split the revenue with its media partners.

Things that make you go hmmm…

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Image courtesy of vectorolie/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

American Airlines had a very good year and I can assure you I had nothing to do with it. The company posted its fourth quarter earnings regaling us with the news that it scored $597 million in net income. That number was particularly impressive since last year at this time the company posted a $2 billion loss. To be fair, (and I hate it that I have to be fair to American Airlines) that loss was because of one-time costs from its merger with US Airways and from its bankruptcy case. American Airlines also hooked in $1.1 billion in earnings with $1.52 per share, beating Wall Street’s estimates by a single, solitary cent. American Airlines can thank dropping fuel prices for some of its impressive earnings and the company plans to take a chunk of its $2.9 billion profit to update its pre-historic fleet and raise salaries. But if you’re hoping for a drop in fares, don’t hold your breath. It’s not happening.

Dow and out…

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Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today’s blizzard/storm had nothing on the Dow’s performance today which looked particularly disastrous with no thanks to some of the world’s biggest companies taking huge hits. Microsoft takes the number one spot with more than a 9% hit on its stock price today, despite the fact that it beat earnings estimates by 4%. Investors just didn’t see the growth, sales and transitioning that they expect from the once powerful and mighty software company. Oh well. Caterpillar takes the number two spot with a 7% hit on its shares. The company missed earnings expectations by $0.20. As prices for copper, coal and iron ore come down, there is less demand for mining equipment, which is precisely what Caterpillar does. The fact that the dollar is stronger than most other currencies is also putting a crimp in the Dow today. Procter & Gamble, is among those companies whose lousy earnings took a nasty 3.8% hit in its stock price, in part, because of this strong dollar of ours.  Other companies that have seen better days on the Dow include: Intel, Cisco, IBM, Nike. But alas, the list does not end there.