McDonald’s Turnaround Plan Needs Salt; Warren Buffet Likes His Sugar; Chevy Volt Wants to Electrify

Would you like to supersize that?

Image courtesy of pakorn/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of pakorn/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook finally revealed to all who were maybe mildly interested about his big plan is to steer McDonald’s back towards fiscal awesomeness, all in the course of a 23 minute video. The world’s biggest burger chain wants to re-franchise 3,500 of its stores. Because franchising offers “stable and predictable cash flow” from collecting fees, it will supposedly save the company about $300 million a year.  And who doesn’t like saving $300 million. Then, Easterbrook wants to make the company’s corporate structure and bureaucracy less “cumbersome” by dividing the company up into four neat little parts. Well, maybe not little. But certainly neater.  The first part is all about U.S. stores. International markets like, Australia and the U.K make up part number two. The third part is labeled high growth markets  – think China and Russia. Then, all those other countries in the world make up the fourth group.  Of course, no master revival plan would be complete without incorporating a customer-focused approach and the ever-menacing prospect of…accountability. But hey whatever works. And something needs to after the company posted a 2.3% drop in sales and revenue that was way too short of its target. Despite detailing this new plan Mc Donald’s couldn’t get Wall Street excited enough to send shares up, even a little.

Enjoy a Coke with Warren Buffet…

Image courtesy of tiverylucky/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of tiverylucky/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In case you couldn’t make it to the the Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting this weekend, also known as Woodstock for Capitalists, here are but a few of the pearls from that auspicious event. Wells Fargo, Coke, IBM and AmEx rock, at least according to the Oracle of Omaha. Mr. Buffet clearly knows a thing or two of what he speaks since his company has a market value of a staggering $350 billion. When he discussed Coca Cola and the $16 billion stake his company owns in it, the debate about the adverse health effects of sugar didn’t seem to concern him. He feels that people enjoy Coke and thus, it apparently makes them happy. Unlike Whole Foods, which he said, “I don’t see smiles on the faces of people at Whole Foods.” No doubt Whole Foods was not happy about that comment. He was also asked about his involvement with 3G Capital with whom he is now buying Kraft Foods. People have taken issue with 3G over its practice of buying companies and then laying off many of its employees. Mr. Buffet, however, said, “I don’t know of any company that has a policy that says we’re going to have a lot more people than they need.”  How charming. As for naming a successor, well, he didn’t.

Low-voltage…

Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Even though gas prices are pretty low, making gas-guzzling SUV’s that much more appealing, that’s not stopping car companies, like GM, from parading out its latest eco-friendly models. The 2016 Chevy Volt model is making its debut and what is supposed to be so electrifying about it is that it’ll be around $1,500 less than the 2015 model. It’ll also get 30% more mileage from a single charge than the 2015 model. It’s a bit redesigned and there’s even a $7,500 federal income tax credit. But to be fair, it’s not a fully electric vehicle because if you find yourself coasting along  the highway – or any road, for that matter – and the battery juice runs out, the Volt becomes just another regular gas guzzler.  If that doesn’t bother you – and why should it – then consider that Chevy is offering 0% financing for 72 months for qualified buyers. Unqualified buyers should take the bus. California’s even offering a $1,500 rebate which pretty much means that GM doesn’t think there’s going to be a waiting list for this particular automobile. Because let’s face it, a Tesla it’s not.

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Jimmy Choo: If the IPO Shoe Fits…; Inversions: The Good. The Bad. The Ugly; Soda Vs. the World

I Jimmy Choos you…

Image courtesy of biosphere/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of biosphere/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Arguably one of the world’s awesomest shoemakers (understatement of the year), Jimmy Choo, propelled to fame thanks to Carrie Bradshaw and “Sex and the City,” is now looking to put a little “pump” into the stock market by coming out with its own IPO next month. Granted, it will be nothing compared to Alibaba’s meteoric rise to the top of the index. Partly because it will be listed on the London Stock Exchange. The other staggering difference is that Jimmy Choo’s valuation, at about $1 billion, will be a wee bit smaller by about oh, I don’t know, $23 billion, give or take. Jimmy Choo has major plans to expand in Asia where  the shoes are not as easy to come by, yet so very many people there want them. And you know, Asia being a pretty huge place and all, has a lot of shoes to fill (sorry, I had to go for that one). The company has seen double digit growth on that continent, especially in China. Which is good because since you can’t score a new iPhone 6+ there, you can at least console yourself with a $2000 pair of shoes.

An inversion by any other name…

Image courtesy of Craftyjoe/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Craftyjoe/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Inversions. They’re baaack. If you recall (and its okay if you don’t), corporations totally dig inversions as a way to reduce the heavy duty 35% tax burden imposed by sweet old Unlcle Sam. Simply put, companies move overseas. It’s a bit more complicated but I’ll spare you all the gory details. The government, this one anyway, gets really annoyed when companies do inversions, because it thinks money is being taken out and away from the US. Now, just as eight major US corporations, Burger King among them, are getting set to pack up their things and head for fiscally greener pastures, US Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew inconveniently announced plans to crackdown on inversions practices and the companies that do them. Lew hopes to “significantly diminish the ability of inverted companies to escape US taxation” and basically make it not worth it for companies to invert. However, Martin Regalia, who just so happens to be the chief economist at the super-important US Chamber of Commerce feels this crackdown is a very very bad idea and says that “the administration just assured that deferred income in the once foreign subsidiary will never come back to the U.S. to help create income, jobs and economic growth here.” Which basically means: “Bad public policy produces bad economic results.”

The skinny on soda…

Image courtesy of artzenter/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of artzenter/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Your soda is about to get a whole lot skinnier – 20% skinnier. And you can forget Coke vs. Pepsi vs. Dr. Pepper vs. whatever…It’s now soda vs. the world as beverage suppliers are getting their game on to try very hard to get Americans to stop consuming so much sugar,  at least from their beverages. This big unified soda announcement came during the Clinton Global Initiative. Apparently a study was conducted that found how between 2000-2013, the amount of sugar people got from their drinks fell over 12%. Which is all good. Especially because the beverage industry took note of this and will now push water and diet drinks more aggressively. Why, they are even going to market those cute smaller size cans of full calorie soda. Which is a really good thing. Especially because those darling little cans are so much more profitable. More so than the bigger regular-sized cans. Go figure. Oh, and they allegedly help with portion control too.