No-GoPro on Earnings; Could a Pfizer/Allergan Merger Become the Next Big Thing?; Wal-Mart Offers NO Free Shipping (limitations apply)

Worst. Day. Ever….

Image courtesy of jesadaphorn/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of jesadaphorn/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

GoPro released its earnings yesterday only to tell us that it did not nail them. This came as a surprise to…no one.  Wall Street echoed its disappointment by sending shares down. Very down. So down, in fact, that the stock is hovering too close to its IPO price of $24 from back in 2014. GoPro miraculously managed to score $400 million in revenue, adding 25 cents per share. Too bad predictions called for almost $434 million and 29 cents per share. Meanwhile, the stock is down 67% for the year and the company is looking to buy back company shares, hoping to increase their value. While GoPro saw second quarter sales kick up by 72%, third quarter sales only increased by 43%. And the picture only gets grimmer as the company actually thinks sales will shrink during the ever-fiscally critical holiday season.  Part of GoPro’s problem is that it can’t seem to figure out how to transform itself from a product for a niche market to a product that spews mass appeal. Then we turn to GoPro’s Hero4Session. Besides the fact that the company initially charged too much for the product, GoPro also insists that the marketing budget for the already too-high priced product wasn’t large enough. Analysts aren’t too optimistic that they are gong to see much, if any, growth in GoPro’s camera unit in 2017. However, they are forecasting $500 million worth of revenue for GoPro’s other products. Go figure.

Erin Go Bragh…

Image courtesy of Pansa/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Pansa/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Today’s latest tax inversion plans are brought to us by Pfizer and Allergan Plc who are in “friendly talks” to create the world’s largest drug maker.  While no actual agreement has been reached, the deal would have Pfizer heading towards Ireland where corporate tax laws are far more favorable there than they are here. Can’t you just smell the politics that are about to invade this deal? Tax inversions happen when huge companies set up shop overseas in countries where they don’t get as brutally taxed as they do here. For instance, while Pfizer has the pleasure of shelling out a 25% tax rate to Uncle Sam, Ireland-based Allergan only has to deal with a 15% tax rate. The prohibitive tax rate can put many U.S. companies at an unfair advantage, they argue. Democrats think these companies should just suck it up and stay put. They also think drug companies should simply slash their high prices. However, these drug companies say they can’t do that with such high tax rates imposed. Republicans want those tax laws changed to make them more favorable for these big companies so that they’ll stay put because they want to. Not because they are being forced to. If any deal goes through, it will likely be the biggest deal. Ever. Estimates for Pfizer to buy Allergan range from about $113 billion to $157 billion. But isn’t it worth every cent if it means adding everybody’s favorite aesthetic filler into your drug fold?

No such thing as ‘free shipping?’

Image courtesy of SundayMorning/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of SundayMorning/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

If you can’t beat ’em…well do something they can’t do.  And that’s exactly why Wal-Mart is scrapping free shipping this holiday season on items that are less than $50. The idea is to instead offer free shipping – for in-store pick up. After all, there are approximately 4,600 Wal-Mart stores from which to choose. Besides, Wal-Mart’s hoping that while you’re picking up an ordered item, you’ll impulsively pick up some other items.  And companies love impulse shoppers.  To entice you to use this method, Wal-Mart is even allowing you to check-in at the store with your smart phone for expedited service. Wal-Mart’s hoping that this new shipping policy will help its profit margins, which have taken a bit of a hit, in part, because of shipping costs. And with 210 million consumers expected to use Wal-Mart’s mobile app, the giant retailer is banking that in-store pick-up will reverse those hits.