Apples to Apples: Warren Buffett Increases Stake in Tech Giant; Groupon’s Earnings Show Everyone Loves a Deal; Trump Wine Makes Trouble

Well, if Warren Buffett’s doing it…

id-10021885

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It’s all about Apple and airplanes these days for Warren Buffett. His company, Berkshire Hathaway, again increased its position in the iPhone maker to 57.4 million shares back in December. This means the company now boasts a hefty $7.74 billion stake in the Cupertino-based company. The Oracle of Omaha also decided to scoop up more shares in the airline industry’s four biggest carriers in the United States: American Airlines Group, Delta Airlines, Southwest Airlines and United Continental Holdings. This little purchase set Berkshire Hathaway back by about $9.3 billion. What’s a bit weird about Warren Buffett’s new-found affection for Apple, is that he has never been much of a fan of tech stocks only because – or so he would like us to think – that they are apparently outside his realm of understanding. I’m pretty sure there’s very little in this world that’s outside his scope of knowledge. Just saying. The airline investment was also a little surprising given Warren Buffett’s hands-off stance on the industry for the last twenty years. Now, however, he apparently sees some potential in airlines that he hadn’t seen in years. In any case, the timing of Berkshire Hathaway’s Apple purchase couldn’t have been better because shares of Apple closed at an all-time high yesterday, as I noted here in this blog.  In fact, shares of all the companies in which Berkshire Hathaway invested have gone up. Because if Warren Buffett puts his fiscal stamp of approval on a company, investors take that as a sign – albeit a not very scientific one –  and they all tend to follow suit.  As for his ten year old Walmart stake, the news was not as good. Berkshire Hathaway dumped almost all of its shares  – close to a billion dollars worth – and analysts are now wondering just how bad of an omen is that.

Get your Groupon, yo!

id-100192702

Image courtesy of ddpavumba/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Groupon, it seems, is not only beloved to bargain hunters, but to Wall Street as well, as the company just released its fourth quarter earnings, easily beating estimates all-around. For a company that’s all about posting discounts, it took in revenues of $935 million, when analysts only expected $913 million. While the company earned close to $370 million in profit, analysts were left a bit bummed, since last year’s number was higher, at almost $372 million. However, Groupon did add 7 cents per share, more than triple the expected 2 cents. Plenty of its success from the quarter is apparently due to its acquisition of website LivingSocial, which Groupon scooped up back in October.  Groupon’s customers increased by two million, one million of whom came from LivingSocial, and its total amount of customers purchased 11% more goods and services during the same period last year. Interestingly enough, the amount of purchases this past quarter was a smidgen lower, coming in at $1.70 billion, when last year at this time it was more like $1.71 billion. But hey, what do you expect from bargain-hunters, after all?

Cheers…

id-10066482

Image courtesy of Graphics Mouse/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In today’s installment of “Who’s Next to Face a Boycott for Carrying Trump Merchandise?”and the #GrabYourWallet campaign, we turn our attention to Wegmans Food Markets.  The offending merchandise in question is wine, or rather products from the Trump Winery, of which Eric Trump, President Trump’s son, is the President. While a group aptly named “Stop Trump Wine,” is calling upon Virginians to boycott businesses that carry the beverages because “Eric Trump shares the views of his father,” the local chapter of the National Organization for Women got 300 of its members to come up with ways to get Wegmans to put the kibosh on the products. But my question is, if the wine is really good, will the boycott be effective? Just wondering. Like all other retailers, Wegmans, with its 92 stores, explains that it only looks at how a product is performing. If the products in question are performing well, with people still buying them, and the boycotts aren’t necessarily having an effect, chances are, the wine stays put.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s