Samsung Looks to Erase its Mistakes; A Not-So-New Chapter for American Apparel; Hedge Fund to Kate Spade: Sell off!

Exploding cell phones need not apply…

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Image courtesy of Pansa/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

There were no over-heating phones in sight as Samsung plunked down $8 billion to acquire Connecticut-based Harman International Industries. In case you have no idea who – or what – Harman is, it’s a company best-known for making premium audio systems for cars. But that’s not all. The company also makes plenty of other hardware for vehicles to connect, which makes it a very good fit for Samsung, as there will be very little overlap. Its products can be found in over 30 million vehicles, including BMW, Toyota and Volkswagen. This acquisition is an excellent opportunity for Samsung to break into the automotive industry where it barely exists. For now, anyway. It will also give the South Korean company a strong foothold in a rapidly growing industry that is expected to experience major growth in the next ten years. And who doesn’t like massive growth, right? By the way, this is the biggest overseas acquisition by a South Korean company. Ever. Samsung is paying roughly $112 per share, a 28% premium to Friday’s closing price.

The final chapter?

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

American Apparel is filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Again. For the second time in a year. After just exiting that protection in February. To be cute, some people call it Chapter 22 because it’s the second time it happened. Get it? Hilarious. In any case, I’m pretty sure American Apparel did set some type of record for earning its second bankruptcy in twelve months. The apparel company will be picked up by Canadian company Gildan Activewear for the bargain price of $66 million. If you recall – and it’s okay if you don’t – American Apparel, arguably best known for its racy ads, first filed for bankruptcy protection back in October 2015, roughly a year after it ousted founder and CEO Dov Charney for a litany of sexual harrassment problems. Charney, who said that the company had been taken from him in a coup, did try to regain control of his company only to have a court put the kibosh on his attempts. Later on, CEO Paula Schneider left after failing to turn the company around. The company, which went from 230 stores down to 110, saw a 33% decline in year over year sales, has $215 million in debt, tons of legal bills courtesy of Dov Charney and took in only $497 million in net sales for 2015. American Apparel will continue to run its normal U.S. operations though, the stores will eventually be put on the auction block. In the meantime, its stores across the pond have already started to experience the trauma and drama of liquidation.

Bag it…

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Image courtesy of lekkyjustdoit/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Kate Spade is not feeling the love from hedge fund Caerus Investors, who whipped out a letter today asking, or rather urging, the lifestyle brand to sell itself. What Caerus neglected to mention in that letter was what it plans to do should such a sale occur. As for Caerus’ stake in Kate Spade, well, if you find out what it is, feel free to share that information as no one seems to know for sure. In any case, Caerus, according to its letter, has become “increasingly frustrated” with Kate Spade brass who have yet to make the company churn out a profit that would be on par with other companies like it.  Caerus doesn’t care for Kate Spade’s profit margins either, which are apparently lower than its peers, besides the fact that its stock also trades at a discount to other companies in the same category. There is something to be said for Caerus’s “frustration” seeing as how there was a whopping 63% decline since Kate Spade’s intraday high back in August of 2014.  Add that to the fact that Kate Spade’s third quarter revenue missed estimates and the stock is down 7% for the year and maybe you might be wondering if Caerus might be onto something. But then, lo and behold, Jana Partners announced that it owns a hefty .85% stake in Kate Spade, which conveniently sent shares up to $17.80 and gave it a very generous $2.28 billion valuation.  So maybe the answer to Caerus’ issues with Kate Spade lays in Jana Partners stake.

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