Add the Military to Wells Fargo’s List of Haters; Tesla’s Not Down With Discounts; Beverage CEO’s Earnings Lose Fizz

And the list of offenses just keeps growing…

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As Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf continued to get a much-deserved beating by Congress today, the bank now finds itself staring down the wrong end of a Justice Department sanction. The reason? It seems Wells Fargo improperly repossessed cars owned by…wait for it…members of the military. That’s right. Wells Fargo was screwing over the very folks who defend this country.  Is your stomach done churning yet?  The bank apparently violated the Service-members Civil Relief Act and both Federal prosecutors and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency have big plans for the bank that have nothing to do with stock options and hefty bonuses. It’s borderline-disturnbing that Wells Fargo proudly proclaims on its website that it has “a history of making banking easier for our servicemen and servicewomen.” If found guilty, Wells Fargo could end up forking over an estimated $20 million in penalties. That would be in addition to the $185 million that Wells Fargo was fined for opening up those two million fraudulent accounts.  Sadly, Wells Fargo isn’t even the first bank to repossess vehicles from service people who were delinquent on their loans. Banco Santander had to pony up $9 million last year for similar actions.

Blame it on Reddit…

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Looks like the discount days are over at Tesla where CEO Elon Musk sent out an email to his employees telling them to stop the practice. Apparently, Tesla has a “no negotiation no discount policy” that was in effect since day one, ten years ago when consumers could first start purchasing the battery-operated vehicles. Musk isn’t even into discounts for employees – which I think is a bit unfair. Just saying. No discounts even when the average vehicle discount in the U.S. is just under $4,000. Of course, discounts can still be applied to floor-model vehicles, test-drive vehicles and vehicles that were damaged during delivery. But for brand-spankin’ new Model S cars, which sell – or should anyway – for about $100,000, don’t even bother calculating their costs other than what the sticker price says. This whole hoopla came about because someone on Reddit posted a question about discounts for Tesla vehicles. The responses to the question did not sit well with Musk, or with analyst Brad Erickson of Pacific Crest Securities. In a research note, Erickson suggested that Tesla was getting loose with discounts in an effort to sell more cars for its third quarter – of which 22,000 were delivered. That figure, by the way, is a 90% increase over last year at this time.  But considering that Tesla has posted an operating loss for 14 consecutive quarters, I suppose there some logic at hand.

Fizzy logic…

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Nick Caporella, the CEO behind the fan favorite drink LaCroix, probably isn’t felling too bubbly right about now. Glaucus Research Group just released a very unflattering report about the Florida-based company, basically accusing it of cooking the books. The report also says Caporella used false invoices and other forms of creative accounting to inflate earnings when they weren’t quite where he wanted them to be. In all fairness, Glaucus has a short interest in the company, in the form of 2.26 million shares.  If National Beverage’s stock falls, Glaucus stands to gain a sizable chunk of cash. And that’s exactly what happened as National Beverage’s stock took an 8% hit today despite calling the report “false and defamatory.” It seems some of Glaucus’ research came from a failed 2012 lawsuit from a former associate.  In any case, shares of National Beverage were up 58% in the last twelve months  – that is, up until its recent drop. Interestingly, the soft drinks National beverages sells, including Faygo and Rip It energy drinks, sell for 40% less than Pepsico’s offerings, yet both companies have the same reported operating margin. Weird, right?  Another unusual tidbit is that despite National Beverages major increases in profit and revenue, its advertising and shipping costs remained flat, according to Glaucus’ report at least. Last month the company reported first quarter earnings where revenue was up 17% to $217 million and profit was up 69% to $29 million. Not bad for a company that basically sells fizzy flavored water and Shasta – remember that one? In the meantime the SEC is staying mum on the subject and the stock closed at $42.67.

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