Sheryl Sandberg: Lean In Women of Corporate America!; Major Tech Company Needs Major Diversity Overhaul; It’s Claw and Order for Wells Fargo

Corporate America Blues…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Sheryl Sandberg had some thoughts to share with world today in the Wall Street Journal. And when the founder of LeanIn.org and COO of Facebook has thoughts, it’s in everyone’s best interest to hear them loud and clear.  Sandberg wrote about the results of a 2016 study of Women in the Workplace, arguably the most comprehensive annual review of women in corporate America. With 132 companies and more than 4.6 million employees surveyed, the results might shock you, but will mostly disappoint. And here’s why: Women continue to face social pushback for daring to ask for what they deserve. Gasp! Apparently such actions are still viewed as “bossy” and “aggressive.” And that is so weird because men are not viewed that way at all for the same actions. Go figure. But then there’s also the fact that women are underrepresented at every single level and hold less than 30% of senior management roles. As if that’s not bad enough, women are also less likely to get promoted from entry level positions to managerial ones and lose ground the higher they climb up that golden corporate ladder.  The news only gets worse for women of color as they are the most under-repped group with the steepest drop-off as they get to middle and senior management. There is hope, though, as more women are asking and getting promotions and raises.  They are negotiating those items just as much as their male counterparts. Unfortunately, women are still less likely to get promoted.  Which is bananas since research has shown that gender diversity helps businesses get better results, revenue and profit.  Sandberg suggests companies set targets, openly discuss gender stereotypes and start helping businesses get better through gender diversity. Let’s hope 2017’s study shows some markedly different results.

Speaking of a lack of diversity…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

When you count the FBI and U.S. Army as your clients, showering you with hundreds of millions of dollars in contracts, it’s best to foster a diverse workplace that shuns the slightest hint of discrimination. And so we have Palantir Technologies, a data mining company founded by Peter Thiel that is rumored to be valued at about $20 billion. The Labor Department is suing Palantir Technologies over discrminination practices against Asian applicants. If the name Palantir Technologies sounds vaguely familiar, it’s because the company’s resources helped track down Osama Bin Laden. Osama Bin Laden aside, the Labor Department believes the company routinely discriminated against Asian applicants for software engineering jobs. In one example, out of an applicant pool of 130 for an intern position, where 73% of the applicants were Asian, only four Asians were actually hired along with 17 non-Asians.  Palantir charges that the Department of Labor was using “flawed statistical analysis,” yet the Labor Department contends that there is just a one in a billion chance that that selection happened by chance. At least Palantir will be in good company as Facebook and Twitter were also sued for discrimination…by Asian-American women.

And then there’s Wells Fargo…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The Board of Directors at Wells Fargo might just be clawing back some of the lofty compensation awarded to CEO John Stumpf and former head of community banking Carrie Tolstedt. That decision will be made on Thursday when Mr. Stumpf gets to testify before the House Financial Services Committee to talk about the two million credit and debit cards that were opened without authorization – under the department that Tolstedt ran. Tolstedt conveniently retired in July, by the way. The big question remains as to how much will be clawed back from Stumpf and Tolstedt.  Stumpf took home about $160 million while Tolstedt walked away with around $90 million. Not too shabby considering the massive fraud that happened under their watch.  And as I mentioned in an earlier post, no top level employees were fired or penalized, yet many many low level employees were given their walking papers. Which is weird because lower-level employees usually just follow the orders they’re given. After all, acting unilaterally in a major banking institution is typically frowned upon. Meanwhile, as Wells Fargo continues to stay mum on the subject, the Department of Labor is launching an investigation into the bank’s questionable workplace practices.

 

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