Macy’s Banks on Closures; Alibaba’s Boffo Quarter; Unvaliant Valeant

Winning…

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Image courtesy of tungphoto/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Shares of Macy’s soared today as investors gleefully cheered the retailer’s decision to close 15% of the company’s 728 stores. Presumably not as gleeful are the employees who work in those stores. While the locations of the closures have not been announced, many of those employees will be given a severance, provided they qualify, or be given the option to relocate. The stores to be shuttered have been costing an annual  $1 billion in annual sales. And in the face of online competition, that $1 billion could be put to better use like beefing up Macy’s e-commerce and finding bigger and better ways to further improve the better-performing stores. With Macy’s looking to invest in a “winning customer experience,” the company plans to bring in more brand shops and host a slew of in-store events that will hopefully drive traffic into the stores. Macy’s 2Q results saw sales fall about 4% to almost $6 billion in revenue with 54 cents added per share. To be fair, it did beat expectations of $5.8 billion in revenue with 45 cents added per share. But a strong dollar, off-price stores, bad-weather and less tourism didn’t help matters. Don’t knock the tourist angle; those visitors account for 5% of Macy’s annual sales.

More winning…

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Image courtesy of tungphoto/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

China’s economy might be struggling but you’d never know it judging from Alibaba’s most recent earnings. The e-commerce giant posted its best revenue growth since its auspicious IPO back in 2014. Revenue grew a mind-blowing 59% from the same time last year to…wait for it…$4.8 billion. That impressive revenue figure was even more impressive if only because more money was made from mobile shopping than from PC’s. Talk about seismic shifts. Interestingly enough, the value of the goods it sells, aka gross merchandise value, only grew by about 24%. And like all good earnings reports, shares went up today on Wall Street. Profit for the e-commerce giant came in at $1.3 billion, a 71% increase over last year, with 74 cents added per share. Analysts only expected shares to increase by 63 cents. Monthly active users increased by 39% from the same time last year. It’s not just that the amount of monthly active users went up, but also that the average Alibaba user opens the app approximately seven times per day. Which probably explains why they account for 75% of the company’s sales.

There’s a fungus among us…

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Image courtesy of tungphoto/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

There’s nothing like a criminal probe to completely throw your shares under the fiscal bus.  Today’s probe is brought to us by Valeant Pharmaceuticals, purveyor of everybody’s favorite toe-nail fungus treatment, Jublia. The burning question is whether Valeant had a very special relationship with a specialty pharmacy that helped inflate its drug prices. The specialty pharmacy at the heart of the probe is, or rather was, Pennsylvania-based Philidor Rx Services. Investigators suspect the mail-order pharmacy and Valeant were a little too close for comfort as far as insurance and wire fraud is concerned. It seems that Philidor wasn’t being entirely truthful to insurers about its relationship with Valeant so that it could sell lots of Valeant drugs at prices that seemed rather high. Distributors, in this case Philidor, are supposed to be completely neutral, yet Philidor seemed anything but, with almost all of its products that it sold coming from Valeant.  These days, however, Valeant (conveniently) says it didn’t condone Philidor’s practices. Valeant naturally neglected to mention the very large role it played in those practices. Incidentally, sales of Valeant dermatological products plunged since Philidor went the way of the dinosaur and now Valeant is staring in the face of $30 billion of long-term debt and a market value that plunged by 90% in the last twelve months. As criminal charges loom large, brass at Valeant have booted CEO Michael Pearson and overhauled the board of directors in a  seemingly desperate bid to restore investor confidence. Good luck with that one.

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