Michael Kors Department Store Diss; Disney Swims to Great 3Q; Ralph Lauren Hits and Misses and Hits

More bag for your buck…

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Image courtesy of duron123/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Michael Kors is biting back at the hand that feeds it: department stores. The accessories company is blaming them for its recent losses, fed up with the constant discounts department stores are putting on Michael Kors merchandise. In case you haven’t noticed there is nary a moment when Michael Kors products are not discounted. I dare you to prove that one wrong. The fact that consumers can use coupons for Michael Kors products? Ugh. Don’t even get them started. In fact, CEO John Idol is putting the kibosh on them and also chucking those friends and family discounts. Michael Kors reported a 7% drop in its first quarter wholesale business and is planning on shipping less merchandise to the stores in an attempt to reclaim some much-needed pricing power. Michael Kors feels that consumers forgot the value of its products. Seems like a prudent move considering that Macy’s, in particular, brings in the largest chunk of wholesale revenue for Michael Kors.  In any case, it’s a strategy that Coach also is beginning to employ, except that Coach also plans to pull out of about 250 stores completely. Earnings came in at $147 million and 88 cents a share on $988 million in revenue. That was a slight change from last year’s $174 million and 87 cents on $986 million. The fact that mall traffic and tourism were down didn’t help matters. Even same stores sales took a 7.4% hit, which was especially brutal since analysts only predicted a 4.2% decline. Still, analysts expected 74 cents on $953 million in revenue, so the earnings weren’t all that bleak in the first place.

It’s Dory’s world after all…

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Image courtesy of AKARAKINGDOMS/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Disney posted impressive earnings throwing a big shout out to its studio division, who cranked out the incredibly endearing and ridiculously, lucratively marketable “Finding Dory.” Okay, so marine life wasn’t the only reason since “The Jungle Book “and “Captain America: Civil War “also contributed to that success. Just not as much. Not nearly as much. In any case,  Disney particularly relished those 3Q earnings considering that its 2Q earrings missed the mark while this quarter it took in $1.62 per share, beating estimates by one penny. But not everything was coming up roses and clown fish at Disney, all because of ESPN and a future for it that looks more bleak than bright. Taking a beating from “cord-cutting” consumers who are giving the heave-ho to cable subscriptions and bundles, ESPN is, not surprisingly, rapidly losing subscribers. The network signed a $1 billion deal with BAMTech to find a way for ESPN to bring “direct-to-consumer ESPN-branded, multi-sports subscription streaming service.” Two words, ESPN: blue tang.

No medals for you…

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Image courtesy of duron123/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Even Michael Phelps couldn’t help win this one. Of course  I am referring to Ralph Lauren’s recent earnings that had the luxury brand posting a 7% sales loss. Ralph Lauren reported a loss of $22 million with 27 cents per share. That’s a far cry form last year when the company took in a profit of $64 million and 73 cents added per share. Revenue, which came in at $1.55 billion, took a hit, but analysts expected that hit to be closer to $1.77 billion so complaining wasn’t necessary. Shares still went up today so clearly these losses have done little to spook investors. That’s because those losses were expected as part of a strategic comeback plan engineered by Ralph Lauren CEO Stefan Larsson, who took over back in November. His grand plan also includes reducing turnaround times from design to shelves and to focus on Ralph Lauren’s core brands – initiatives that he thinks will generate roughly $180 million to $220 million in annual savings. That and closing about 50 stores should have Ralph Lauren returning to its fiscal glory in no time.

 

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