UnderArmour Gets a Chink; McDonald’s Deserves a Break Today; Rate a Minute! No Hike in Sight

Fit to be bit…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Under Armour seems to have suffered a chink in its earnings as its profits took a particularly brutal 57% dive. The primary culprit is Sports Authority, a company that is thisclose to becoming retail history, but was also one of Under Armour’s biggest retailers carrying tons of its merchandise. Hence, Under Armour took what’s called an impairment charge, and impairing it was, to the tune of $23 million. Last year at this time, the Maryland-based company hauled in an impressive $14.8 million profit. This year, however, that profit was a very disappointing $6.3 million. On the bright side, Under Armour is headed to Kohl’s 1,100 department stores next year. Apparently, it’s a way to connect with female consumers. Who knew. Under Armour brass think this new foray into Kohl’s will make women’s sales hit the $1 billion mark. Besides, since Nike, Under Armour’s biggest competitor, also happens to have a strong – very strong – presence in Kohl’s,  Under Armour hopes its new endeavor will take a big chunk out of the competition’s sales. But if Under Armour’s numbers still fail to impress next quarter, it might have to do with the exorbitant real estate it just leased in New York City – the renowned FAO Schwarz toy store. The rent on that baby ought to set the company back. But the athletic apparel company is banking heavily that the location location location will more than compensate by bringing in some boffo sales.

Mac-attacks need not apply…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The Golden Arches seemed to have lost their luster this quarter with worse than expected earnings and profit falling over 9% to $1.1 billion. But how could that be if you and everyone you know was there all the time dining on its delectable all-day breakfast selections? And herein lies the problem. Well, part of it anyway. You see, McDonald’s breakfast offerings skew cheaper than the rest of its menu items. Apparently consumers really like having the option to eat breakfast for lunch…and dinner. And they did. A lot. Instead of the pricier items. Incidentally, Dunkin Brands Group Inc, Starbucks Corp and Wendy’s, to name a few, also reported unsavory earnings and shares of McDonald’s took a nasty tumble, bringing along the rest of the industry with it. It seems McDonald’s menu prices also had a negative impact on earnings. The cost of food went down in grocery stores and because of it, more would-be diners chose to eat at home. The curious thing is that the cost of food also went for McDonald’s, which ought to mean that its selections should have been cheaper, or at any rate, stayed the same price. Except that they didn’t because McDonald’s had to increase menu prices to compensate for increased labor costs.

Fed-up…

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In case you were holding your breath to see if the Fed is going to raise rates, you can let it out now. It won’t. At least not before September. Or maybe even December. Apparently the money experts want hard-core evidence of a pick-up in inflation before the Fed decides to make any changes. The Fed wants to see a 2% inflation rate, which might seem like an incredibly minuscule number, yet it’s one that carries incredible weight.  Then there’s the not-so-slight issue of the relatively healthy U.S. economy in the face of the not-as-healthy global economy. Even as the markets here reached new highs, with a labor market that saw an impressive 287,000 jobs added in June, experts – me not being one, mind you –  expect maybe one rate hike this year. From the Brexit to China and other assorted EU drama coming down the pike, the Fed’s not too eager to put in for any hikes until the rest of world cooperates they way it ought to, fiscally speaking anyway. After tomorrow, the Fed’s got three more meetings this year to decide its next move, so sit tight. Or don’t.

Mo’ Money, Mo’ Brexit Problems; DOJ V. Health Insurance Industry: The First Round; No News is Not Good News at Yahoo

It’s all Brexit to me…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The bad Brexit news just keeps on coming with the IMF now sharing its unpleasant thoughts. The fund has cut the global forecast for the next two years, expecting global economic growth for 2016 to come in at 3.1% and 3.4% for 2017. And those figures are on the bright side since the IMF feels that there is “sizable increase in uncertainty” about how bad the Brexit damage will be. That forecast is riding the wave that the EU and British officials will graciously reach new trade agreements that won’t make trading conditions any more challenging than necessary. If officials can’t hash out the details then Britain just might be staring down the wrong end of a recession. All because of the Brexit vote. Perhaps the pro-Brexiters really didn’t expect investors would ditch Britain in favor of more fiscally welcoming euro areas. And who can blame the ditchers, seeing as how the pound has dropped an ugly 12% against the dollar since the ominous vote. The IMF, however, still anticipates actual growth for the UK, if only by a paltry 1.7%. By the way, this is the IMF’s fifth time cutting its forecast in just 15 months. In fact, had the Brexit vote gone the other way, the IMF was set to upgrade global projections. Way to go Britain! As for the impact in the U.S., the IMF thinks it will go relatively unscathed. How reassuring.

Put up your dukes…

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Looks like there won’t be any big health insurance company mergers. At least not if the Department of Justice has its way. Which it usually does. Anthem’s proposed $48 billion merger with Cigna and Aetna’s proposed $34 billion merger with Humana are on hold, and maybe permanently, as the Justice Department gets set to file antitrust lawsuits to block their ambitious plans. The Justice Department, which has been scrutinizing these deals for a year, is worried that these mergers would reduce competition and harm the little people a.k.a. the consumers with much higher prices. But the health insurance companies argue that they’ve endured some challenges with President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act and would like to prove the Justice Department wrong by shedding assets to competitors which would help them achieve cost savings and better results. Anthem and Aetna argued that their proposed mergers would provide them with the right scale to create more savings. And who doesn’t like savings? But the Justice Department isn’t biting. A merger between Anthem and Cigna would give the  newly combined company 54 million members with $117 billion in yearly revenue. The health insurance industry would shrink to three humongous players from five massive ones. United Health Group would sit smack dab in the middle of them. Expect a fight. A very long and costly one. Investors apparently are as shares went down today at all four health insurance companies.

How much is that website in the window?

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What’s to talk about at Yahoo is that there is not much to talk about at Yahoo. Still no word on who will buy the site’s core internet assets, though today is the last day that bids will be accepted. Offers are expected to be between $3.5 billion and $5 billion. Rumors are swirling that Verizon will be the lucky/likely buyer. Not that that has been confirmed. What has been confirmed is that Yahoo managed to eke out earnings of nine cents per share. Too bad expectations were for ten cents.  To add insult to fiscal injury, last year at this time Yahoo took in 16 cents per share. Want to hear about Yahoo’s net loss? Of course you do. The company ate $448 million in net losses. Just to put that into perspective, last year at this time Yahoo only lost $22 million. Yahoo also found itself writing down the value of Tumblr. Again. The first time it did that this year it was for $230 million. Now it was for $382 million. Yahoo bought the internet site just three years ago for the whopping sum $1.1 billion. Oh well. It’s like paying full price for something that went to clearance shortly after. Yahoo also slashed its work-force, going from 11,00 employees to 8,800 employees. And just so you know, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer said that the cost-cutting measures are working. It’s just not clear for whom.

 

Starbuck$$$ Coffee Buzz Gets Pricier; JPMorgan Ups the Minimum Pay Game; Drop in Job Openings Bums Out Economists

And then it happened…

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If there’s one thing you can rely on at Starbucks, besides the quality of their coffee, it’s that come July, the company will raise its prices. Today, the company did just that for the third year in a row. What Starbucks dubs as a “small price adjustment” shouldn’t be too bad. Well, that is, depending on what you purchased. Hey, if you don’t like it, blame rising coffee costs. And Starbucks, too, I suppose. The amount of Americans who drink coffee is expected to rise by 1.5%. The more people drink, the more the beans cost. Just another case of supply and demand, my friend. Prices went up between 10 cents to 20 cents on its brewed coffee, and between 10 cents and 30 cents on its espresso beverages and tea lattes. However, the price increases vary depending on which region you find your local Starbucks. In the grand scheme of things, purchases only actually increase by about 1%. Plus, the price went up on only 35% of its beverages. Which means that 65% of its beverages remain unchanged, price-wise, for those of you who shun change. But in all fairness, Starbucks is giving its employees a 5% raise come fall, not to mention doubling stock awards for employees who have been there for two years or more. Not that their raises and stock awards had anything to do with boosting the price of your chai latte, mind you.

Dimon in the rough…

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Starbucks isn’t the only company who is giving its hardworking employees a raise. Enter JPMorgan, the second most profitable company in the United States, who is about to give 18,000 of its employees a much appreciated boost in their paychecks. And this time, the employees aren’t even the ones who regularly rake in big bonuses. JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon will be raising the company’s minimum pay by 18% for employees who are mostly bank tellers and customer service representatives. These employees currently receive $10.15 per hour, but over the next three years will see increases of $12 per hour and then $16.50 per hour, depending on several factors. The company is also beefing up its in-house training programs as well, to the tune of $200 million, that will train thousands of entry level employees who work in consumer banking. Mr. Dimon says the new initiative is all about addressing concerns over income inequality, an issue that’s been getting a lot of negative attention, usually directed at Mr. Dimon and his peers. He also says it’s a way to attract and retain talent – an idea that company’s like Walmart, Target and McDonald’s have already started putting into practice. But leave it to the skeptics to whip out their negative spin and question if Dimon’s motives have more to do with a shrinking labor pool, and if JPMorgan is just getting ahead of an issue that might pose a problem in the future. The cost of raising the minimum pay by 18% will cost JPMorgan just about $100 million, which is just $7 million shy of the total 2015 compensation for Jamie Dimon and his four top-named executives.

Book of jobs…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Even though JPMorgan and Starbucks are giving its employees more money to attract and retain great employees, the Bureau of Labor Statistics paints a very different employment picture. According to its latest report, job openings dropped to a five month low in May, with just 5.5 million jobs up for grabs, even though that same month also saw 5 million people getting hired. Not to be a downer, but that was the lowest rate since November 2014. At least voluntary quits fell to a 4 month low, with just 2.9 million leaving their jobs, presumably for better opportunities. Yet in April, job openings were at an all-time high. All these mixed numbers might just mean that the economy is not as healthy as we think it is. The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, a.k.a JOLTS, is the division of the Bureau of Labor Statistics that tracks job openings, hires and separations. The Labor Department, which reports just on job creation and unemployment, reported that employers only managed to create 11,000 new jobs in May. In case you’re wondering why that’s a bad thing, then consider that those 11,000 jobs were 25 times less than the amount of jobs created in May of 2015. At least the number of layoffs and firings in May fell to a ten month low of 1.67 million. Economists, however, still think these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt. Which is easy for them to say since they seem to be gainfully employed.

French Company Goes Organic for U.S. Acquisition; U.S. Airlines Gear Up for Cuba; U.S. Banks Bond Over Brexit

Let them eat organic cake!

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Dannon Yogurt’s parent company, Danone (said with a French accent) is looking to pick up  a major U.S company that will effectively double its size. That’s assuming all goes according to plan. Danone wants to offer organic food provider, WhiteWave, purveyor of favorites like Silk Almond and Soy Milk, Horizon Milk and Earthbound Farms, $10.4 billion in cash for the fiscal pleasure of its company. That’s a 24% premium over WhiteWave’s thirty day average closing price and comes out to about to $56.25 per share. But for Danone, whose looking to make itself a bigger presence in the United States, it’s well worth it, since WhiteWave’s offerings tend to attract wealthier consumers. WhiteWave generates annual sales of about $4 billion and with this acquisition, Danone expects to see a $300 million boost in operating profit. Danone has also been struggling in other parts of the world and this acquisition would ease the burden of some of those lesser-performing markets. FYI, when companies offer to buy other companies, their offers tend be at least at a 30% premium. Because this offer was not, it theoretically means that the bidding door is still open to other offers from companies like Coca Cola, PepsiCo and Kellogg Co, to name but a few. In a regulatory filing, though, WhiteWave did graciously say that it wouldn’t solicit other offers. However, there are exceptions. Should WhiteWave go with another offer, Danone still wins because it will get a $310 million break-up fee.

Bienvenido…

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Believe it or not, Hillary Clinton wasn’t the only topic of conversation today coming out of Washington DC. President Obama announced a proposal to allow eight U.S. airlines to provide nonstop service between Cuba and ten U.S. cities, beginning this fall. This will mark the first time in 50 years that travel of this kind will be available. And all this just one year after diplomatic relations were re-established. The city and airline selections were made by the Department of Transportation and the lucky airline winners are: Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Frontier Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Southwest Airlines, Spirit Airlines and United Airlines. American Airlines is actually no stranger to the island nation, as it has been offering charter services there since 1991. Just last year the airline made over one thousand chartered flights to Cuba, while JetBlue made over 200 chartered trips. That’s awfully welcome news for an industry that took a fiscal beating lately. The cities that can look forward to the new service had to have have substantial Cuban-American populations already in place. Hence, Florida finds itself the recipient of 14 out of the 20 daily nonstop flights, since it boasts the largest Cuban-American population. The cities include: Atlanta, Charlotte, Fort Lauderdale, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami,  Newark, New York City, Orlando and Tampa. According to Cuban officials, the number of American travelers to Cuba is up 84%, compared to last year, in just the first half of the year.  But there is still a trade embargo in place, which does include a travel ban. However, there are twelve convenient categories of reasons to fly to Cuba that you can check off should you decide to make your way to Havana any time soon.

Come together…

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It’s a fiscal kumbaya as four U.S. banks offered up their sincerest support for London following the Brexit vote. The gracious supporters include, JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Morgan Stanley. The banks agreed to help British Finance Minister George Osborne find ways to ensure that the U.K. remains the prominent financial player that it always was, pre-Brexit. And of course they all will try and find new and exciting ways to lure and retain big banking to London so that the consequences of the Brexit don’t do the country in completely. While that sentiment no doubt warmed the hearts of investors all over the world, the investment banks could not offer up as much optimism as far as the jobs situation is concerned. After all, “no one in their right mind would currently invest in Britain.” Keeping those jobs there might might be the biggest challenge of all and no one wants to make any promises on that. Especially Jamie Dimon, who had previously mentioned that around 4,000 jobs could make their way out of London. In the meantime, the French wasted no time – I mean NONE! – in announcing to the world that it would make its tax regime as enticing as possible, in a not at all subtle attempt to grab some pricey banking business from London.

The Hostess with the Mostess is Baaaack; Airlines Take a Fiscal Hit, Yet Consumers Shed No Tears; Starbucks Set to Raise You Up

 

Sugar high…

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Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

No need to get all sentimental here, but Hostess has arrived. Again. The Twinkie maker is set to go public in the fall, following a deal with Gores Holdings which picked up a huge stake in the company. It seems like only yesterday when Hostess rode a fiscal roller-coaster that almost had the sweets maker go bust four years ago. But those days are now far behind, as the Ding-Dongs proprietor boasts a $2.3 billion valuation. The folks who bought the company, Metropoulos & Co. together with Apollo Global Management LLC, were the same ones who restored Pabst to its original glory. They picked up Hostess for $185 million and borrowed another $500 million to basically rebuild the company from the ground up. They did just that, but smaller. Much smaller. Almost all union workers were ousted, equipment was upgraded and even robots were brought in for some labor. Just like “The Jetsons.” Sort of.  Before Twinkies disappeared from shelves for those dark seven months, the company employed 19,000 people, most of them union. Now there are closer to 1,200 employees – not including robots, and more than 95% of them are NOT union workers. Top brass also unloaded Wonder Bread and Nature’s Pride, got products into movies theaters and restaurants, launched a new marketing campaign with celebs, including the illustrious Will Ferrell and threw in a countdown clock in New York’s Times Square for New Year’s. Hostess also doubled the shelf life of its products to 65 days. You might not find that especially appetizing, but investors sure did. And in case you were skeptical about the Will Ferrell choice, then consider that Hostess’s market for sweet-baked goods is up over 16% and posted $650 million in revenue for 2015. The company is now poised to hit $772 million in revenue for 2016 and by 2017, profit is expected to grow to $101.8 million.  If you’re still not convinced that the Hostess tide is turning, then look out for frozen fried Twinkies, making their coronary debut in a few weeks. Then we’ll talk.

Karma, I tell you…

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Looks like the airlines have taken a hit and I suspect no one feels too sorry for the industry’s top players. Delta,  American Airlines, United Airlines and even Southwest posted declines between 12% and 31%. So sad, no? The demand just wasn’t enough for air travel and that, coupled with some other factors, made for some very unpleasant earnings and share declines. But cry me a river. These are, after all, airlines we are talking about. In my most humble opinion, it sometimes feel that they make a sport out of fleecing travelers. Just saying. Delta shares fell on the news that its revenue per each seat flown one mile dipped by 5%. Despite the wordiness of that calculation, it is how airlines measure their success. It also them helps determine just how much pricing power they have. And wouldn’t ya know it. They currently don’t have as much as they’d like. For now anyway. And that’s welcome news for travelers who aren’t too happy shelling out big bucks for uncomfortable seats. Delta, the second largest airline, actually had been expecting the decrease, but a smaller one of no more than 4.5%. The airline also ate a $450 million loss because they bet against fuel prices. Actually, Delta bet that fuel prices would jump and locked in some fuel purchase contracts called hedge contracts. Prices did, in fact, jump. Just not as much as Delta had hoped they so Delta ditched the contracts and ate a half billion dollars on them. So sad, no?

Nothing to buzz about…

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It’s July, oh faithful Starbucks drinker and do you know what that means? It means that it’s time for the price of your caffeine fix to go up. After all, it’s tradition. Actually, the tradition is to raise the prices during the first week of July, yet here were are and no increase. But fear not because Starbucks already made a statement that a price increase is on the horizon. Besides, due to a pricing glitch, some loyal drinkers were already charged that increase. Oops. However, those unfortunate consumers could have only been overcharged by, at most, 30 cents. There’s no official word yet on which drinks will be getting pricier, but  the ones that do go up will only go up by as much as – you guessed it – 30 cents. There is one more caveat, though. The amount of money a drink increases varies by region. So perhaps a move might be in order. Just saying. The fact is coffee futures keep going higher and are up over 10% just this year. Even if you are annoyed that your coffee habit is about to eat a bigger chunk out of your bank account, Starbucks knows that you’re still gonna keep whipping out the cash for it. In any case, if you think you did get overcharged on your recent Starbucks purchase, you can call the customer service hotline at 1-800-782-7282 to request your refund.

Google’s Tax Troubles Continue in Madrid; Will Oreo Scoop Up Hershey?; Pier 1 Not Feeling the Outdoor Love

Mucho dinero…

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Image courtesy of Sira Anamwong/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It was just another day in the life of Google as authorities raided its offices, this time in Madrid, Spain. At issue, yet again, is the search engine giant’s corporate tax practices in Europe and the looming question as to whether or not Google, and other big corporations like it, are steering their profits legitimately, in order to score a reduced tax rate. Spanish authorities are investigating the search engine giant to see if it has been in engaging in the  dark art we know as tax evasion. Back in May, France investigated Google for “aggravated financial fraud” and “organized money laundering” which both sound awfully sinister. France is hoping to get $1 billion from its investigation. Even Italy’s authorities are in on the action and looking to see if Google underpaid its taxes there as well.  Google already forked over $175 million in back taxes to British authorities, whose politicians are still whining because they feel that the amount was too low. Expect more post-Brexit griping. Naturally, Google and its peers are calling out their innocence and are adamant that they comply fully with tax rules. But, at any rate, the investigations still seem far from over.

Yummm…

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Image courtesy of Sira Anamwong/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The mood is sweet on Wall Street with talk of a Hershey takeover from Oreo maker Mondelez International. Given that there’s a trend to cut back on the amount of sugar people have been consuming, the timing seemed opportune for a buyout of a company that makes the world’s most beloved -in my opinion, anyway – chocolate bar. Mondelez, which also makes Cadbury chocolates, is currently the second largest confection manufacturer in the world. If the buyout goes its way, it will become the number one sweets maker, as 90% of Hershey’s revenue comes from North America. Shares of Hershey shot up 22% on the tasty news, hitting a record high of $117.79. Shares of Mondelez also went up, just not as much. Hershey’s market value is about $21 billion, give or take. But in order for the buyout to go forward, the Hershey Trust would have to give its blessing. After all, it controls 81% of Hershey stock and voting rights. However if you’re looking for some hostile action, might I suggest you look elsewhere. Mondelez already pledged to not shed any jobs and to keep the illustrious Hershey name intact.

Missed it…

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Image courtesy of Sira Anamwong/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It’s looking like a long walk off a short Pier 1 as revenue for the home store chain came in at a disappointing $418.4 million. That number might seem impressive, except that it wasn’t to analysts, who were expecting revenue closer to $420 million. The company lost $6 million in profits and 7 cents a share when predictions were for a 5 cent per share loss. If those figures weren’t depressing enough, then consider that last year at this time, Pier 1 took in revenue of $436.9 million with a $7 million profit and an 8 cents per share gain. Shares of the company are now 50% less than what they were a year ago. The big area to disappoint was outdoor furniture. Darn you, outdoor furniture. That category was supposed to bring in some boffo results, but instead proved to be a real downer. The table top category did nicely. Just not nice enough. Taking a page from Chipotle, the company will now attempt to march out a rewards program and even add a gift registry. Which is weird, because I assumed the company already had a gift registry. I even went to check just now and wouldn’t you know it? It doesn’t. In any case, the company is forging ahead with plans to close 20 stores, while it already shuttered 8 this past quarter. Pier 1 did, however, open another three stores, presumably in more economically hospitable areas.

GE is Not too Big Anymore. To Fail, That is.; Diamonds Need a New Best Friend; Kellogg’s Wants to Make Cereal Great Again;

On your own…

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You can rest easy now as GE no longer poses a systemic threat to the financial stability of the United States. Phew. Three months ago, GE officially requested to unload its “Too Big to Fail” designation and voila! Shedding close to $200 billion in assets helped it achieve that lofty goal. Unfortunately, none of those dollars made their way to me. But I digress. With the Financial Stability Oversight Council voting unanimously to remove the label, officially called “Systemically Important Financial Institution” (or SIFI if you’re nasty), GE no longer requires lots of added, and presumably unwanted, scrutiny from the Federal Reserve. So now, nobody cares if it fails. Well, maybe just its employees and shareholders. And if it does (but why would it?), the government won’t have to throw at it a $182 billion taxpayer-funded bail-out like it did for AIG. Boom.

A girl’s best friend?

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Image courtesy of Boykung/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It’s called the Lesedi la Rona and is the second biggest diamond mined. Ever. Clocking in at 1,109 carats, about the size of a tennis ball, so they say, this behemoth of a stone is only second to the Cullinan diamond that was discovered more than one hundred years ago. The 3,106 carat Cullinan, however, was cut cut into several polished stones and now shares a very posh home with the British Crown jewels. The same fate could not be said for this latest find. Last night Sotheby’s tried to auction the darn thing off, but the 3 billion years old diamond couldn’t even clear its $70 million reserve price. The rock was expected, according to some estimates, to fetch about $84 million with the bidding starting at $50 million. The bidding went up – “in strained pauses” – in increments of $1 million. But after fifteen minutes, the highest bid only came in at $61 million. Lucara, the Canadian company that owns the precious rock, saw its stock fall 18%  after the news that it failed to sell. Sadly, for the diamond industry anyway, prices for rough diamonds have fallen 18%, the most its fallen since the fiscal crisis of 2008.

Snap, crackle, pop…

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With cereal sales hitting the skids, falling by 1% this year, Kellogg’s has come up with a way it hopes will make cereal great again – cereal cafes. For about double the price of your average box of Apple Jack’s you can walk into Kellogg’s Cereal Cafe in Times Square (where else?) and order yourself a hearty bowl of Froot Loops accompanied by mini marshmallows and passion fruit jam. Yeah. You read that right. Or how about some Rice Krispies doused in green tea powder, fresh strawberries and ice cream. You didn’t see that one coming did you? Sounds swanky and that’s definitely the idea. Cereal sales have gone down 2.4% in the past four years, getting overshadowed by grab-n-go foods and being shunned by that pesky group we call Millennials. Cereal sales fell to about $10 billion in 2015, which might seem impressive except that way back in 2000, cereal sales came in close to $14 billion. According to research firm Mintel, 40% of Millennials could not be bothered with the clean-up required to eat a bowl of cereal and milk. However, 82% of that group still see cereal as a great snack sans the milk. Go figure. Next time you get the urge for a bowl of Special K mixed with Frosted Flakes, pistachios, lemon zest and thyme at 8:00 at night, then you’re in luck. The cafe, which opens July 4, will serve breakfast from 7:00 am until 11:00 pm.