Trump Getting Carrier’d Away with Employment Numbers; Get Ready to Rumble with Trump’s Latest Pick; Unemployment Lows Give Economists a High

Adios…

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Just when you thought he’d Tweeted it all…It’s Trump vs. the union boss in the next installment of the President-elect’s Tweet-drama. This time Trump took on union boss Chuck Jones, who serves as president of United Steelworkers 1999 over at Carrier.  Trump tweeted that Jones has “done a terrible job representing workers.” That’s just one of the many pearls that escaped Trump’s social media account. “Spend more time working-less time talking. Reduce dues,” was another gem he tweeted about his current dispute. Look for this exchange to come back and haunt him when it’s time for re-election. In any case, Jones said Trump was giving people false hope about the job situation at Carrier, and told the Washington Post, “…for whatever reason, he lied his a– off.” What Trump allegedly lied his a– off about was the 1,100 jobs he is taking credit for saving. He might have temporarily and theoretically – depending on whom you ask – sort of saved closer to 730 jobs and the problem with Trump’s math is that the 1,100 number might have included 300 jobs that weren’t even in danger of heading across the border. Come mid-2017 and another 600 Carrier jobs are gone as well, whether Trump is involved or not. And after all those lay-offs, Carrier will have a grand total of 800 manufacturing workers and another 300 engineers on its roster. Carrier was offered $7 million worth of tax incentives and credits to stay put. Jones said $23 million worth of concessions were offered up in order to entice Carrier not to head off to Mexico. But Carrier still stands to save $65 million by moving south and well…you see where this is headed. If Carrier decided to remain in the U.S., employees would have to agree to ditch benefits and earn $5 per hour below minimum wage.  Let’s see Trump fix that one.

Let’s get ready to rumble…

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In other Trump drama, the President-elect just picked WWE co-founder Linda McMahon to head the Small Business Administration. Which seems only fair considering she gave a whopping $6 million to a pro-Trump super PAC. Although, she did call Trump’s comments about women deplorable, so that’s something in her favor. The Senate still needs to approve the pick, but all signs point to her getting the gig. With offices in every state, the SBA helps small businesses and entrepreneurs get financing and training. McMahon, like Trump, supports a lower corporate tax rate and less government regulation. She founded WWE thirty years ago with her husband Vince McMahon. McMahon made two previous attempts to get into Washington DC when she ran for Senate seats twice in Connecticut. Both times she lost and the cost of the campaigns set her back about $100 million.  Not that it put much of a dent in her bank account. WWE is a publicly traded company with a market value of $1.5 billion. McMahon herself owns $84 million in company stock. And by the way, Trump is a member of the WWE Hall of Fame.

Nothing to do with Trump…

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The number of Americans filing for unemployment fell from its five month high last week.    That should leave you feeling positively giddy as it signals a very healthy strong labor market. With this bit of news you can expect the Federal Reserve to hike those rates next week. The number of people who filed for first time benefits dropped by 10,000 to 258,000 applicants. It also marks the 92nd straight week that claims fell below 300,000  – a fiscally remarkable feat which hasn’t been seen since 1970. And again, that points to another good sign of a healthy labor market. In case you were curious about what economists were predicting – and it’s okay if you weren’t – the numbers were as expected. With the labor market seen as near full-employment, the government also released data showing that unemployment hit a four year low of 4.6% back in November. And bonus: the number of Americans who receive unemployment benefits fell a glorious 79,000 to 2.01 million.

Starbucks Betting on $10 Coffee; Trump Ready to Dump on Pharmaceuticals; Trump’s June Stock Dump

Jolted…

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Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz is stepping down from his post in April with plans to build a Starbucks’ prestige brand where he will serve as its Executive Chairman. The idea is that by going upscale Starbucks will be able to raise its profile with those pesky millennials. Besides that, the company needs to compete with a number of other upscale rivals that keep rearing their gourmet heads all over the place. One thousand “Reserve” brand stores are slated to set up shop with another 30 large Reserve Roastery (expect to find that word added to a dictionary near you) and Tasting Rooms expected to open up all over the globe. In case you were wondering what one orders from this new prestige brand, you might consider purchasing a $10 cup of coffee that you can sip daintily from a glass siphon.  Or perhaps you’re up for paying $50 for an 8 oz. bag of an exotic, small-lot coffee? I’m sure you’ll find something worth depleting your funds.  In any case, Starbucks also announced plans to open another 12,000 stores –  that’s in addition to its already existing 25,000 stores –  in the next five years.  Five thousand stores are slated just for China. The company also plans to annually boost revenue by 10% while adding between 15% – 20% to its shares, and increase its focus on its food offerings since the coffee giant is convinced it can double its growth in that area.

What a pill…

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Donald Trump’s latest executive plans involve bringing down drug prices and the pharmaceutical companies that keep increasing them with seemingly reckless abandon. Which is kind of ironic since pharmaceutical stocks saw a huge surge following Trump’s election. And here they thought they had an ally. Hah! A Kaiser Family Foundation survey leading up to the election found that people felt drug prices were the number one healthcare issue for the next President. Well, I guess the President-elect is ready for it then. Sort of. Trump has yet to outline any concrete plans on how he is going to achieve this goal. But during his campaign, Trump did say that he is all in favor of consumers having their meds re-imported. He also wants Medicare for the elderly to renegotiate drug prices directly with pharmaceutical manufacturers. That should be fun to watch, especially because both the industry and many many Republicans are vehemently against that idea. Stay tuned for that drama. Just today, Pfizer Inc. and Flynn Pharmaceutical Ltd. were slapped with some massive record fines in the UK after raising drug prices by…wait for it…2,600%. Now, Pfizer will cough up about $106 million, while Flynn will fork over approximately $6.5 million. I guess they should be happy that they were busted in the U.K. and still have time to clean up their act in the United States before Trump-dom takes effect. In the meantime, Allergan Plc. CEO Brett Saunders is bracing himself for the new president’s impact and said Trump could end up being more “vicious” on pharmaceuticals and their drug pricing than Hillary Clinton might have been. But he also pledged to limit price increases to less than 10% per year. Or perhaps he did that lest Trump unleash his Twitter wrath on Allergan, just like he’s done to several other individual companies including Carrier Corp., Ford and Boeing.

Under-stocked…

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Yesterday, President-elect Donald Trump’s team announced, with no explicable reason as to the timing, that he sold off all of his stocks back in June. Don’t hold your breath for proof of that sell-off as none was provided. While being interviewed today on the “Today” show by host Matt Later after being named Time Magazine’s “Person of the Year,” Trump explained that he decided to unload his stock holdings in order to avoid any conflicts of interest. How very gallant of Mr. Trump.  And even though the press was not made aware of it until yesterday, Donald Trump insisted that everybody already knew. We just don’t know who “everybody” is. Mr. Trump went on to say that he sold off his stocks since he knew he would win the election and would be making deals for the United States that could affect various companies in all sorts of different ways. That was indeed very thoughtful of him. He also said he didn’t even own that much stock.  Which is debatable at best since a recent filing from December of 2015 valued his holdings at $40 million. But in all fairness, his stock market holdings pale in comparison to his real estate holdings which apparently make up the bulk of his net worth.  Ethics experts, however, are suggesting those real-estate holdings might also be a conflict-of-interest as well. Just saying. It’s worth noting that since his sell-off, the S&P 500 went up over 10% while the Dow Jones Industrial Average hit some very impressive all-time highs. Since Trump’s victory, many stocks have also hit all-time highs and, of course, he’s taking credit for it.

Trump Tweets Out Boeing’s Air Force One; Lego’s Brick-By-Brick Expansion Plans; SeaWorld Sees Layoffs

Boeing going gone…

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President-elect Donald Trump was on Twitter. Again. This time he was telling Boeing to cancel the order for the new Air Force One that’s in the works.  In his usual eloquent manner he said that the cost to build the plane “is totally out of control.”  And just what exactly does “out of control” look like when you’re building a fleet of aircraft for the Commander-In-Chief? Well, it depends on who you ask but Trump has that figure pegged at $4 billion, though it’s not entirely clear where he got it. Another report has the Air Force budgeting the new planes at about $1.6 billion. However, it’s expected that the fleet of planes will cost $102 million this fiscal year, and another $3 billion over the next five years. So maybe Trump’s got his ducks in a row on this one. His tweets went on to say: “I think Boeing is doing a little bit of a number. We want Boeing to make a lot of money, but not that much money.” He probably would prefer if Boeing weren’t making that money off taxpayers’ backs. The Pentagon wants to replace the current fleet as it will have reached its 30 year service life in 2017. It has been around since 1990, has flown over one million miles and, in all fairness, could use  more than few upgrades – whether Trump’s on board or not. Which he won’t be because the aircraft is not scheduled to be ready for another ten years or so. Naturally, shares of Boeing fell on the news of Trump’s sentiments. In the meantime, 56% of Americans think Donald Trump uses Twitter way too much. Perhaps the time has come for his cabinet members and advisers to take away his phone.

Lego to stand on…

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Lego CEO Jorgen Vig Knudstorp is stepping down from his position and that’s actually good news. Knudstorp is leaving his post in order to move on to greener pastures as Chairman of  the Lego Brand Group. The toy company is on a mission to restructure itself to keep up with its growth momentum. By creating the Lego Brand Group, the company plans to explore new business ventures, opportunities and ideas that will help expand the brand in new, exciting and highly profitable ways. For the first half of the year the company posted an unwelcome surprise drop in profit of $499 million though its revenue still went up. The company blamed Americans, or rather, the fact that sales in the United States were flat. But, that’s probably the same thing. In any case, as part of his new gig, Knudstorp will be overseeing the family’s 75% stake in the company which is currently run by fourth generation Lego owner Thomas Kirk Kristiansen. Chief Operations Officer Bali Padda will take over for Knudstorp, officially becoming the first non-Dane to hold the post. The privately held company is headquartered in Denmark and employs over 18,000 people. Knudstorp, who said he plans to stay at Lego for the rest of his career, joined the company back in 2001, when the company was losing about $1 million a day. Lego just couldn’t compete with an exponentially-increasing digital toy industry. But it turns out it didn’t need to when it made Knudstorp CEO in 2004. Under his leadership, he made changes, booted people, brought in new folks and saw Lego’s revenue jump fivefold. Last year the company fiscally surpassed both Mattel and Hasbro, even with all their Barbie/ My Little Pony/Hot Wheels/electronic toys, to become the number one toy company in the world. No small feat considering that unlike Mattel and Hasbro, Lego pretty much makes just one product with assorted variations: a plastic brick.

Under water?

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With shrinking attendance, decreasing revenue and dwindling profits, SeaWorld announced plans to say a not so warm goodbye to 320 of its employees, both salaried and hourly. It was only back in 2014 that SeaWorld said goodbye to another unlucky 300 employees. The  soon-to-be-former employees will be receiving “enhanced severance benefits” which is fancy talk for some cash and maybe health insurance to tide them over for a little while. SeaWorld has even offered to help them find work elsewhere. How moving. The entertainment company is on a mission to restructure itself in any way possible to keep it from losing any more money than it already has. Of course, cost-cutting always factors in, along with examining how best to improve and streamline the rest of the business. Back in March SeaWorld made the decision to stop breeding Orca whales and also scrapped the shows in which the whales starred. SeaWorld is also blaming Disney and Universal for their disappointing digits, unable to woo away visitors from their PETA-friendlier attractions. Also, there seemed to be a drop in Brazilian visitors, presumably because they remained in Brazil for the Olympics, one might suspect, which apparently affected SeaWorld’s earnings.  Who knew SeaWorld relies on a Brazilian contingent to patronize its parks to help churn out a buck or two?

Grocery Disrupt: Amazon’s Latest Venture Good Become a Store Near You; Tyson’s New Add-Venture; Trump’s Taxing Tariff Tweets

Move over, humans…

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Just when you to start to wonder what else Amazon could possibly do to disrupt and reinvent the retail shopping experience, along comes Amazon Go, an actual brick-and-mortar-store brought to you by the e-commerce giant. Talk about irony. The concept, which is still being tested by Amazon employees, allows shoppers to literally grab food and walk out. No lines. No cashiers. Customers just take their cellphones and tap them on a turnstile to get logged into the store’s network, which in turn connects to the Amazon Prime app, already conveniently installed on their phones. Customers pick items off the shelf and put them into their cart while, with the aid of sensors and artificial intelligence, the same items are also placed in virtual shopping cart. If a shopper decides that they don’t want an item, they simply place it back on the shelf and the item also disappears from the virtual cart. Like magic. Should you crave something a bit more immediate, the store also offers up fresh food, prepared on site. Once customers are done, they simply walk out while the app does all the work, which basically involves adding everything up and then charging respective Amazon accounts. The company has been on the hunt to gain a big presence in the food retail industry, an industry which still fiscally eludes it, and also happens to be one of the biggest retail industries. Ever.  Its fresh food delivery is nice and all, but Amazon’s set its sights on competing with the big grocery players like Wal-Mart, Krogers and Target. The food retailer index took a 1% dive on Amazon’s news while shares of Amazon went up. But established grocers can breathe a very brief sigh of relief easy as Amazon still has a few months before it opens up the store to the public. And humans, fear not. One tech investor said that people are still a very big, necessary component of the retail experience and to scrap the notion that jobs will be lost to machines. Phew.

Speaking of food…

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What to do when you’re a $20 billion company whose prime business is chicken, beef and pork, and you keep losing money to the alternative-meat and fresh-food industry? Why, you set up a venture capital firm, of course. And that’s just what Tyson Foods did in an attempt to compete with a burgeoning industry that is literally eating into its business model. Apparently, plant-based protein and food sustainability is where it’s at these days and if you can’t beat ’em then join ’em by investing in their start-ups. Hence we have Tyson New Ventures LLC, a $150 million venture capital firm that Tyson launched to tap into a market that favors more plant-based and fresh food. The venture capital firm will look to companies that are working on making food-related “breakthroughs” and new innovative technology and business models that relate to food. Tyson already announced its first investment a few months ago, when it bought a 5% stake in Beyond Meats, a company that makes meat-like products. Tyson has got nothing to lose either, considering its last earnings report was nothing short of dismal, and the news that its long-time CEO Donnie Smith was stepping down did nothing to instill confidence in investors. Tyson isn’t the only firm to try out this venture capital idea. Other companies like Campbells Soup, Coca Cola, General Mills and Kellogg’s have all established similar firms with pretty much the same objective: to continue to be a prominent player in a shifting market and industry landscape.  So far this year venture firms have already thrown $420 million into various food and agricultural companies. In 2015 that number approached $650 million.

A day without Trump?

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Over the weekend, President-elect Donald Trump mentioned, in a series of tweets of course, that he wants to get back at U.S. companies who dare shift jobs and production overseas. His preferred revenge tactic would be in the form of a 35% tariff and, strangely enough, his fellow Republicans don’t seem to be on board. The top House Republican, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, does not support Trump’s tariff idea and thinks that the best, most effective way to create and keep jobs in the U.S. is via major tax reform. There seem to be a whole bunch of issues at play with Trump’s (overly) ambitious tax-revenge plans, including the fact that such a move goes against the whole spirit of free trade and has the potential to spark trade wars. And nobody likes wars, whether they involve armed conflict or goods and services. Tax specialists and other assorted experts have also said that it’s fairly debatable as to whether or not Trump’s tactics are even legal.  Republicans are, however, partial to over-hauling the corporate tax code in an effort to keep U.S. companies from fleeing to more tax-hospitable countries. They’d like to cut that pesky corporate tax rate to 20% or less which would allow the U.S. to be more competitive globally. House Republicans are also in favor of imposing corporate taxes to all imported goods and services and scrapping them for exports. But leave it to the critics to argue that changes like that might be seen as violations of the World Trade Organization.  In any case,  it remains to be seen how exactly Trump will get his way, if he does. That’s because tariffs aren’t typically applied to specific companies but rather entire classes of goods. Besides, the president doesn’t get to make those kinds of decisions anyway. That’s for Congress to decide and Congress doesn’t seem, shall we say, receptive, to Trump’s tariff talk.

How Trump Is Dulling Tiffany & Co.’s Sparkle; Just Another Multi-billion Dollar Monday; Oil Vey! OPEC Squabbles Over Oil Cuts

Occupying 5th Ave…

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Despite occupying some of the the best real estate in the world, Tiffany & Co.’s New York flagship store is having some sales troubles no thanks to president-elect Donald Trump,  whose nearby police barricades, protests and secret service detail have taken a big chunk out of the store’s traffic. And that’s a huge problem, especially because the U.S. is Tiffany & Co.’s biggest market, and its Manhattan store accounts for 8% of the company’s sales. At least there’s China and Japan, whose currency fluctuations allowed consumers in those regions to take advantage of a strong yen that had them picking up all kinds of nifty goods from the iconic jeweler. Mainly because of that, the company posted a surprise 1.2% sales increase – the first sales rise in eight quarters. Same store sales didn’t fare as badly either, even though experts thought they would. Instead of declining an expected 2.8%, they fell just 2%. In the United States, presumably in locations where Trump does not reside, Tiffany & Co. experienced a smaller than expected drop, falling just 2% compared to last year at this time. The luxury jeweler scored a $95 million profit, pulling down 76 cents per share on sales of $949.3 million. Analysts only expected 67 cents to be added to shares with sales totaling $923.7 million.

Shattered…

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Move over $3.36 billion. Move over $3.39 billion. The original sales estimates for cyber-Monday proved no match for the actual numbers. Adobe Digital Insights whipped out the results for this year’s post-Thanksgiving shopping extravaganza, which blew estimates out of the water and came in at a whopping $3.45 billion – over a 12% increase from last year’s cyber-Monday purchases. But what’s super weird is that apparently there were less deals on cyber-Monday than on Black Friday. However, Black Friday’s numbers were looking awfully green as well, setting a record with a 22% increase over last year and coming in at just $110 million less than cyber-Monday. Some analysts were a bit concerned that the abundance of web sales on Thanksgiving would put a dent in cyber-Monday’s digits. But wouldn’t you know it? That didn’t happen. Purchases made using Wall-Mart’s app jumped 150% while Amazon is expecting to report its best cyber-Monday. Ever. But you’re just going to have to take their word for it. As for losers, look no further than Macy’s. Perhaps it was karma for opening its doors at 5:00 pm on Thanksgiving Day, but the company experienced outages on its website that kept a lot of shoppers from making a lot of purchases on the company’s site. The amount of money the retailer likely lost was probably not enough to offset the fact that it opened its doors on Thursday. Boohoo.

Why can’t we oil just get along?

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The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, also known as OPEC, is having a big fancy meeting in Vienna tomorrow. At issue is the problem that there is way too much oil floating around all over the world. This oil glut is making oil prices low which makes for really good prices at the pump. However, the countries that produce all this oil don’t like that one bit and are trying to agree on how to fix it so that prices go up again and they can start making cold hard cash. Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq are the biggest oil producers and the logical step would be for each country to cut their production. But none of them want to do that. There’s a lot of ego involved. It’s like color war, but with actual valuable commodities at stake, besides national pride. Saudi Arabia is proposing cuts of 1.2 million barrels per day. However, Iran’s not down for making any cuts because it feels it needs to make up for lost time from all those years of Western sanctions it faced – and totally deserved – and still does deserve. Iraq is using ISIS as a very convenient, if somewhat legit excuse since it is, after all, fighting a war against a psychopathic terrorist organization, and the money it gets from selling oil helps fund that lofty endeavor. Rumor has it that Iran and Iraq are coming around but no word on whether Saudi Arabia will play ball. So stay tuned to see if and when more OPEC drama plays out, and how this drama will affect your wallet and your green car aspirations.

 

Trump’s Been Dealing it to Himself; Volkwagen Wants Your Love Back; Excuses, Excuses: Barnes & Nobles Whips One Out

Even more Trump’d up…

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President-elect Donald Trump’s foundation admitted it “self-dealt.” Self-dealing is when  leaders of non-profit organizations take money from the charities they lead, for themselves, their businesses and/or their families. It’s a big no-no and in case you were wondering where and why Donald Trump admitted such things, then look no further than his 2015 IRS tax filings, available on GuideStar, a website that tracks non-profits. But rest assured an investigation has been opened, brought to us by Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who declined to comment due to the fact that the investigation is ongoing.  And in case you were wondering about this as well, Team Trump thinks Schneiderman’s investigation is politically motivated. In other Trump news, stocks were rallying and the Dow went above 19,000 points. Plenty of people on Wall Street are crediting Trump for all of this fiscally joyful news – whether they voted for him or not. After all, he did promise to slash taxes, ease regulations and go big on infrastructure spending. Experts see these initiatives as excellent means to boost the economy in a ways that have been lacking for years. Unfortunately, not every economic idea coming from Camp Trump is leaving investors and economists all warm and fuzzy. Take for instance NAFTA, which Trump refers to as “the worst trade deal in history.” Major havoc could be wreaked on the economy if Trump decides to scrap it. Millions of Americans rely on free trade with Mexico and slapping tariffs on it could spell fiscal doom.

You’re gonna love me, I just know it…

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Volkswagen, the Wells Fargo of the auto industry,  is betting – and hoping – that it can reclaim its former fahrvergnügen glory and make you love them all over again. Following its epic diesel-emissions scandal, Volkswagen chief Herbert Diess announced he wants to “fundamentally change Volkswagen” by focusing on on major tech advancements, developing battery operated vehicles and adding some some self-driving cars into the mix. Diess has got big eyes on the year 2025, by which time he hopes to sell a million electric cars. He wants to “massively step up” Volkswagen’s car tech and also introduce a greater variety of SUV’s to the North american market because, after all, Americans apparently love their SUV’s. But with those lofty goals comes a plan to eliminate 23,000 jobs in the more traditional areas of the auto-manufacturing industry. Instead, Volkswagen will take on 9,000 new employees to work on tech, while wisely offering those 23,000 employees the option of early retirement over a certain amount of time, perhaps in an attempt to soften the blow. In the meantime, Volkswagen already coughed up a hefty $15 billion settlement with both U.S. regulatory agencies and Volkswagen owners.

Uh, if you say so…

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Barnes & Noble reported yet another dismal quarter of declining revenue, except this time the bookseller is blaming the election for its poor fiscal performance. How convenient. Sales fell 3.2% and probably would have fallen even more were it not for sales of “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.” Barnes & Noble also reported that their online sales improved 12.5%, however, that figure might be a bit more convincing if it provided an actual dollar amount in its report. Nook devices, digital content and accessories were down close to 20%. But can all of that really be blamed on the election? Hmmm. On the bright side, operating losses for the Nook this quarter were only $8.2 million. Hey, don’t laugh. Last year at this time that figure was $30 million. All in all, Barnes & Noble still has cause to celebrate as it only lost just over $20 million and 29 cents a share when last year it lost $39 million and 52 cents per share. B&N is hoping the holiday season will help its reverse course and give it a fresh dose of fiscal mojo. CEO Leonard Riggio is hoping the company’s new $50 Nook device, debuting on Black Friday, will be a big hit. In the meantime, he’s banking on some concept stores, including one that just opened in Eastchester, New York, boasting a full-service restaurant.

 

Wells Fargo Banking on More Headaches; Tonka Christmas Present Sparked – But it Wasn’t Joy; Tyson’s Not Feeding Enough of You Like Family

Leash tightening…

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Wells Fargo’s spanking seems to be far from over. Regulators are looking to make life utterly miserable for the bank by placing on it all kinds of restrictions that weren’t initially required as part of September’s $190 million settlement. For instance, if Wells Fargo wants to hire or make changes to senior level management and executives, the Office of the Comptroller of Currency is requiring a 90 day heads up and ultimately gets the final say. If the OCC doesn’t care for a person’s “competence, experience, character or integrity” then they’re out. As for those illustrious “golden parachutes” afforded managers who leave the company, the OCC gets to ban them if it sees fit. And unlike so many other banks, the OCC will no longer grant Wells Fargo expedited treatment for branch openings, and instead any new application for a branch opening will be subject to careful review. It’s not clear why the OCC changed its mind about the additional restrictions and a lot of experts thinks it’s nothing short of weird. Some speculate that the OCC is worried that they appeared soft on Wells Fargo and therefore imposed the restrictions. But others suspect this has more to do with the fact that the OCC didn’t handle the scandal well. The fact that former employers insist the over two million fake account openings occurred well before the 2011 point that regulators suggest, is just one reason. Then there’s the glaring issue of all those whistleblowers who were terminated after calling the Wells Fargo ethics hotline. Over 5,000 low-level employees were fired, yet mysteriously, higher-level execs went unscathed.

Dreaming of a fiery Christmas…

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Black Friday is still a few days away, yet there will be one less toy crowding the shelves this holiday season: The Tonka Truck 12v Ride On Dump Truck. The battery powered mini-vehicle seats two and the Harden family of Washington thought it wold make a great present for their grandson. Only problem is, driving home from Toys “R” Us, the ride-on toy caught fire in the back of Mr. Harden’s truck. Mr. Harden quickly pulled over to extinguish the flames and proceeded to drive back to Toys “R” Us to return the darn thing. Except the toy truck reignited, only this time it also set the grown up’s truck on fire as well. A Toys “R” Us spokesperson said that the incident appeared to be an isolated one and decided against issuing a full recall. Yet the toy company still went ahead and yanked the item from the shelves and its website as it attempts to investigate with the manufacturer, Dynacraft, what exactly went wrong. Incidentally, the toy received mostly bad reviews on Amazon and the Toys “R” Us website, with most people citing battery problems as the reason. As for the Hardens they got a full refund and a horrifying start to their holiday season.

Hard to swallow…

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Investor appetites were not whetted today by Tyson’s earnings. The announcement that it would be changing CEO’s sent shares tumbling a very unappetizing 15%. But that’s not all. Profit came in at $391 million with $1.03 added per share, earning the company a 52% increase over last year at this time. To me that sounds like a respectable number, however, to Wall Street it was nothing short of a disappointment as expectations were for a $462 million profit. Tyson, purveyor of Jimmy Deans Sausages and Ball Park Hot Dogs, also reported a 13% drop in sales. Sales fell from $10.5 billion last year to a meager $9.2 billion, all while estimates called for $9.4 billion. To be fair, food prices had fallen, giving the company sales figures that were hard to digest. Tyson is looking to make between $4.70 and $4.85 per share for the year, but that’ll do little to cheer up investors who were initially expecting to see full-year earnings of $4.98 per share. Tyson’s troubles don’t seem to be going away anytime soon either with animal-right activists hounding the company because they take issue with Tyson’s supply chain practices. Throw in a class-action suit accusing the company of collusion and price-fixing and you’ve got yourself a company that spooks investors more than it feeds them.